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I am trying to understand the basics of C programming and I'm kind of new to C, I am failing to understand why the output of my program is:

1 2
1 1

Quite alright, I understand the output from the first printf() but I do not seem to get the logic behind the second printf(). Why can't it display 1 2 as well?

#include <stdio.h>

int main()
{
    int a = 1, b = 2;

    printf("%d %d\n", a, b);
    printf("%d %d\n", a, a++);

    return 0;
}
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1  
1  
Which compiler are you using? With GCC v4.6.2, I get 2 1 for the second line! And also with GCC v4.3.4 –  Johnsyweb Feb 19 '12 at 8:49
4  
I removed the C++ tag; this smells like C. You shouldn't ever conflate the two. –  Donal Fellows Feb 19 '12 at 9:02

5 Answers 5

up vote 5 down vote accepted

a++ is post-incrementing a. That is, the value of a is copied before it is returned and then it is incremented.

As I mentioned in the comments, I get a different result to you, for the reason I explain below.

If you add printf("%d\n", a);, after your last call to printf() you'll see 2 because a has now been incremented.

If you want to see 1 2, you could pre-increment a (that is increment it and then use it), but you need to introduce a sequence point for this to be guaranteed to work because the order of evaluation of function arguments is unspecified by the standard and you want to use a twice:

printf("%d ", a);
printf("%d\n", ++a);

See it run!

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1  
No, you should use two separate printf statements, because the order of evaluation of function arguments is unspecified. You could just as well see 2 2. –  Chris Lutz Feb 19 '12 at 8:34
    
@ChrisLutz: I was editing my answer a you typed that. –  Johnsyweb Feb 19 '12 at 8:39

The expression a++ evaluates to the current value of a and as a side effect increments a by 1. The expression ++a evaluates to the current value of a + 1 and as a side effect increments a by 1.

If you had written

a = 1;
printf("%d\n", a++);

you would get the output 1, because you're asking for the current value of a. Had you written

a = 1;
printf("%d\n", ++a);

you would get the output 2, because you're asking for the value of a + 1.

Now, what's important to remember (especially with ++a) is that the side effect of actually updating a doesn't have to happen immediately after the expression has been evaluated; it only has to happen before the next sequence point (which, in the case of a function call, is after all of the arguments have been evaluated).

Per the language definition, an object (such as the variable a) may have its value changed by the evaluation of an expression (a++ or ++a) at most once between sequence points, and the prior value shall be read only to determine the value to be stored.

The statement

printf("%d %d\n", a, a++);

violates the second part of that restriction, so the behavior of that statement is undefined. Your output could be any of 1 1, 1 2, a suffusion of yellow, etc.

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Post Increment, increament after use

#include <stdio.h>
 int main()
    {
      in a = 1, b = 2;

      printf("%d %d\n", a, b);    // 1 1
      printf("%d %d\n", a, a++);  // 1 1
      printf("$d", a); // 2
      return 0;

      }

Following is pre-increment :

#include <stdio.h>
 int main()
    {
      in a = 1, b = 2;

      printf("%d %d\n", a, b);    // 1 1
      printf("%d %d\n", a, ++a);  // Could Be "1 1" OR "1 2"... sequence is undefined here.
      printf("$d", a); // 2
      return 0;

      }
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4  
To repeat what was said above: printf("%d %d\n",a,++a); is undefined behavior. You'll probably get "1 2" or "2 2", but anything at all could happen. –  bames53 Feb 19 '12 at 8:38

++ is the increment operator. It increments the variable with 1. However, there's a subtle difference between ++a and a++.

The former increments the variable first, and so it affects the value directly. The latter has lower precedence.

So, when you do this:

printf("%d %d\n", a, a++);

You'll get 1, 1

When you do this

printf("%d %d\n", a, ++a);

You'll get 1, 2

This link might help you understand better: http://www.swish-db.com/tutorials/view.php/tid/506

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3  
No you won't. The order of evaluation of function arguments is unspecified, so if ++a (or a++ for that matter) is evaluated before a, you'll get 2, 2 (or 2, 1 in the first case). The fact that the code "appears" to work as "expected" is an unfortunate coincidence. –  Chris Lutz Feb 19 '12 at 8:33
1  
Actually printf("%d %d\n",a,++a); is undefined behavior. You'll probably get "1 2" or "2 2", but anything at all could happen. –  bames53 Feb 19 '12 at 8:35
    
@bames53 - I knew it was "bad area" but I thought it was just unspecified, and I didn't feel like looking it up. I thought UB was only for modifying a variable twice without a sequence point; this is only modifying it once, but the order is unspecified, so whether the second argument is 1 or 2 is up for grabs. –  Chris Lutz Feb 19 '12 at 8:37
    
In the C++ standard "If a side effect on a scalar object is unsequenced relative to [...] a value computation using the value of the same scalar object, the behavior is undefined." (§ 1.9 p15) –  bames53 Feb 19 '12 at 8:50
    
@ChrisLutz In fact I think that means that printf("%d %d\n",a,a++); is undefined behavior as well. The only thing I can find about the sequencing of ++ is that the modification of a is sequenced after the value computation of a++ and before the function call. I don't see anything that sequences the modification with respect to uses of the operand in other arguments. A quick check with a compiler shows that changing the order from a,a++ to a++,a does change the printed values, and therefore that it's not sequenced. –  bames53 Feb 19 '12 at 9:45

Actually, ++x and x++ increment x the same way. The only difference is that ++x returns a reference to x and x++ returns the previous value as a temporary. The "incremented after it's been used" explanation is incorrect.

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1  
C (which, despite the C++ tag, is what the OP really appears to be using) doesn't have references. ++x returns an lvalue and x++ an rvalue, though using the lvalue from ++x is clearly a terrible idea. –  Chris Lutz Feb 19 '12 at 9:00
    
Whether a temporary is used depends on the CPU ISA. (Yes, that's how it tends to happen these days.) –  Donal Fellows Feb 19 '12 at 9:00

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