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I am wondering what the semantics of using the abstract keyword in combination with a trait is.

If the trait does not define any abstract methods, the abstract keyword does not prevent me from creating an instance:

scala> abstract trait T
defined trait T

scala> new T{}
res0: java.lang.Object with T = $anon$1@12cd927d

On the other hand, if the trait does define an abstract method, I cannot create an instance (without implementing this method of course) no matter if the abstract keyword is present or not:

scala> abstract trait T { def foo : Unit }
defined trait T

scala> new T{}
<console>:9: error: object creation impossible, since method foo in trait T of type =>    Unit is not defined
              new T{}
                  ^

scala> trait T { def foo : Unit }
defined trait T

scala> new T{}
<console>:9: error: object creation impossible, since method foo in trait T of type =>     Unit is not defined
              new T{}
                  ^

So what is the abstract keyword in front of a trait good for?

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You can't create an instance of a trait. When you say new T{} you create an anonymous object which mixins the trait T. –  sschaef Feb 19 '12 at 13:27
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2 Answers

up vote 17 down vote accepted

It has no effect, traits are automatically abstract.

The abstract modifier is used in class definitions. It is redundant for traits, and mandatory for all other classes which have incomplete members.

http://www.scala-lang.org/docu/files/ScalaReference.pdf

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You're not creating an instance of the trait. Traits can't be instantiated.

You're creating an anonymous object, mixing the trait into that anonymous object.

So, the reason why can create an instance in the first case, is because you're not creating an instance of the trait (which is abstract) but an object (which isn't).

In the second case, the reason why you can't create an instance is that if you inherit from something, whether that is a trait or a class, you ultimately have to implement its abstract methods somewhere along the inheritance chain in order to instantiate it. In the first case, there are no abstract methods to implement.

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I think you mean that he is creating an anonymous class, which has the trait as a mixin. –  oxbow_lakes Feb 19 '12 at 15:11
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