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I am trying to work out the running time of my splitting program,

void splitX(int x) {
     if (x<=1) {return x;};
     splitX(n/2);
     System.out.println("splitting in progress");
     splitX(n/2);
     splitX(n/2);
     splitX(n/2);
}

I am fairly new to this, this is what have done so far;

T(n) = 4T(n/2)
     = 4^2T(n/2^2)
     = 4^3T(n/2^3)
     = 4^kT(n/2^k)
     = O(log n)

Am i on the right track, im getting a little confused, also do you have to account for the printing line?

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4 Answers 4

up vote 3 down vote accepted

The analyzis is true until the end, the solution is T(n) = O(n^2)

Note that 4^kT(n/2^k) != O(log n) since 4^k is not a constant.
Have a look at the analyzis:

T(n) = 4T(n/2) = 
     = 4^2T(n/2^2)
     = 4^3T(n/2^3)
     = 4^kT(n/2^k)
     = 4^log(n)*T(1) =
     = 4^log(n) * 1 =
     = (2^log(n))^2 =
     = n^2
     = O(n^2)

To formally prove it: we use induction
base: T(1) = 1 = 1^2
Assume T(n) = n^2 for each k <= n
T(2n) = 4*T(n) =(induction hypothesis) 4*n^2 = (2n)^2

Thus the induction hypothesis is true and T(n) = n^2

You can also check this result on wolfram alpha

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thanks for this, could you explain how the 4 at the front makes a difference? would changing it to 3 for example change the run time? –  Lunar Feb 19 '12 at 16:27
    
@Lunar: yes. The "4 at the front" causes the formula to be "power of". Note that your analyzis got T(n) = 4^k * T(n/2^k)m which leads you to 4 * 4 * ... * 4 [logn times]. If it was "3 at the front" - it would have been 3 * 3 * ... *3 [logn times] which is 3^logn [bigger then n, smaller then n^2] –  amit Feb 19 '12 at 16:32

As I see it you make log(N) calls to your recursive function. multiplying this by a constant - 4- does not change complexity, nor does the printing line (for all homework related needs).

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This is plain wrong, since the "constant" is 4^k, which is not a constant. the answer is T(n) = O(n^2). You can check the result in my answer or in wolfram alpha –  amit Feb 19 '12 at 13:44
    
@amit, youre right of course, sorry. –  WeaselFox Feb 21 '12 at 9:21

Yes, in Big-O notation it's O(log n) mulltiply by constant.

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This is plain wrong, since the "constant" is 4^k, which is not a constant. the answer is T(n) = O(n^2). You can check the result in my answer or in wolfram alpha –  amit Feb 19 '12 at 13:44
    
was my mistake, thanks! –  mishadoff Feb 19 '12 at 13:47

the expression is of form

T(n)=4T(n/2) + c

now apply master theorum using a=4, b=2 and f(n)=c;

T(n)=O(n^loga) //base 2

T(n)=n^2

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