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I have this code in C++ which is giving weird output:

#include<iostream>
using namespace std;
int main(){
    int r[15]={0};
    int n = 5;
    r[15]=20;
    cout<<n;    
}

The output should obviously be 5, but it gives me 20. Now I know r[15] is out of bounds. This code should've thrown an exception for trying to access r[15], shouldn't it? However, it compiles normally with g++ and giving wrong output. I'm not able to figure out what's causing this anomaly. Can anyone help?

Just FYI, this code is just a sample, I had to figure this bug out from a larger code which took me a lot of time which, otherwise, could've been saved if an exception was thrown.

Update: I checked the following code:

#include<iostream>
using namespace std;
int main(){
    int n = 5;
    int r[15]={0};
    r[15]=20;
    cout<<n;
}

Output:
20

I checked the following code too:

#include<iostream>
using namespace std;
int main(){
    int n = 5;
    int a=5;
    int r[15]={0};
    r[15]=20;
    cout<<n<<endl<<a;
}

Output:
5
5

So if the stack explanation is correct, either of the values should've been modified in this case too, right? It doesn't.

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Especially while you're learning, consider using std::vector<int> and at() - much easier to use safely, and at() will throw exceptions if given an invalid index. –  Tony D Feb 20 '12 at 8:15
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2 Answers

up vote 9 down vote accepted

Since r is a 15-element array, r[14] is the last element. Therefore r[15]=20; is undefined behavior. C++ doesn't do bounds checking so you won't get exceptions when dealing with plain arrays.

In your case r[15]=20 happens to overwrite the stack at the precise location where n is stored.

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Check my update. –  Deepak Mittal Feb 19 '12 at 13:12
2  
@dpacmittal Undefined behavior. Read my answer again carefully. "it happens to overwrite". There's no guarantee, the compiler can and will reorder things. Say it with me: undefined behavior. –  cnicutar Feb 19 '12 at 13:14
    
Ahh, thanks. That makes sense :) –  Deepak Mittal Feb 19 '12 at 13:21
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Now I know r[15] is out of bounds. This code should've thrown an exception for trying to access r[15], shouldn't it?

Not unless you're using some kind of checking library, no. C (and C++) are very close to the machine and so you can get yourself in this kind of situation. (That's part of their power.) There are compiler flags on some compilers that will insert bounds checking (at a runtime cost), but gcc doesn't do it (you can find patchsets to add it as a feature, though I think only for C).

What's happened there (apparently) is that your n variable ends up on the stack immediately after the 15 slots of the r array:

+-------+
| r[0]  |
| r[1]  |
| r[2]  |
...
| r[13] |
| r[14] |
| n     |
+-------+

...and so writing to your out-of-bounds entry r[15] ends up overwriting it (in your particular case; that's not behavior you can or should count on, the order of things on the stack is not defined as being determined by the order in which they're declared in the source, and may well not be).

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I'm not sure if your explanation is correct because the problem remains even if I declare n before r. Also, if I introduce a new variable 'a', the problem disappears. I'll update my question and include the new code. –  Deepak Mittal Feb 19 '12 at 13:08
1  
@dpacmittal: The point here is that assigning to r[15] results in weird behavior. It's out of bounds, so don't do that. :-) The precise weird behavior you get will depend on the compiler (at least), and quite possibly the runtime environment. See the last sentence in the answer, in particular the bit "...in your particular case; that's not behavior you can or should count on". –  T.J. Crowder Feb 19 '12 at 13:18
    
Yes, I get it now. Thanks :) –  Deepak Mittal Feb 19 '12 at 13:20
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