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public int S1x;

public void Execute()
{
    Random random = new Random();
    S1x = random.Next(14, 146);
    if (S1x % 15 != 0)
        Fix(S1x);
}

public int Fix(int SX)
{                
    Random randomG = new Random();
    SX = randomG.Next(14, 146);
    if (SX % 15 != 0)                               
        Fix(SX); // This is the recursion

    return SX;
}

Every few runs it'll work fine, but then I'll try compiling and running it again and it will give me this error:

System.StackOverflowException was unhandled An unhandled exception of type 'System.StackOverflowException' occurred in mscorlib.dll {Cannot evaluate expression because the current thread is in a stack overflow state.}

And, yes, I know that there is an easier way to do this, but my method of setting a value to equal a random number between 14 and 146, while also ensuring that it is a multiple of 15, should still work nonetheless.

I just am really confused also to why it only gives me the error message sometimes.

So what's wrong with it? Why is it being labeled an infinite recursion even though there is nothing infinite about it?

share|improve this question
5  
So sometimes and random doesn't click with you? What if no number divisible by 15 comes up until the stack has run out of space? –  flq Feb 19 '12 at 14:26
    
Wait? Why was the rest of that code removed? –  leppie Feb 19 '12 at 14:43

2 Answers 2

Even if you fix the problem -- that you are creating a new Random object every time seeded based on the current time -- your code is still neither correct nor efficient. Remember, a recursive method needs to have the following characteristics to be correct:

  • A trivial problem can be solved without recursion
  • The recursive step makes the problem smaller
  • A finite number of recursions always reduces the problem to a trivial problem

You don't have any of these properties, so recursion is the wrong solution.

If you want a random number that is between 14 and 146 and also a multiple of 15, you don't need any recursion. The only such numbers are 15, 30, 45, 60, 75, 90, 105, 120 and 135. So just say:

private int[] array = { 15, 30, 45, 60, 75, 90, 105, 120, 135 };
private Random random = new Random();
...

return array[random.Next(0, array.Length)];

or even better: pick a random number between one and nine, and multiply that by 15.

return random.Next(1, 10) * 15;
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks, I actually ended up using the second solution, as that's what my Business/ Computer Science teacher initially recommended when he first saw my problem. –  Kevin Young Feb 19 '12 at 20:57
    
@KevinYoung I would also mention that in general, if you have a recursive algorithm that's blowing the stack (where recursion is the right solution), the solution is to turn it into an iterative one. In this case, you'd just loop while ((SX % 15) != 0); then, the function would just take a long time if it happened to get a long series of numbers of which none were multiples of 15. Of course, random.Next(1, 10) * 15 is the simplest solution. –  phoog Feb 21 '12 at 15:39

new Random() seeds itself with Environment.TickCount (milliseconds since the system started) to generate pseudo-random numbers, if you seed it with the same number twice the first call of rand.Next(x, y); will return the same value every time.

    public int Fix(int SX)
    {

        Random randomG = new Random();
        SX = randomG.Next(14, 146);
        if (SX % 15 != 0)
        {

            Fix(SX); // This is the recursion
        }           
        return SX;
    }

Since you're creating a new instance of Random every time you run this function (within the same milisecond) it'll generate the same number. So it'll get called thousands of times before generating a new number. If you do this:

    Random randomG = new Random();
    public int Fix(int SX)
    {
        SX = randomG.Next(14, 146);
        if (SX % 15 != 0)
        {
            Fix(SX); // This is the recursion
        }           
        return SX;
    }

At least it'll be generating a new random number every time you call it so you'll be much more likely to hit one you want before a stack overflow.

Edit: I forgot to mention why recursion is a bad idea for achieving this. Don't actually use the code above, it's still a bad solution. I won't amend my answer now though because a much better answer has been posted

share|improve this answer
    
How did the rest of the code get removed? I did not do so. –  Kevin Young Feb 19 '12 at 14:45
    
@KevinYoung somewhat counterintuitively, you can see the version history of your question by clicking the "2 days ago" link where it says "Edited 2 days ago". I have to say that the problem is far easier to understand in its current form, so I'd discourage you from restoring the rest of the code. –  phoog Feb 21 '12 at 15:33

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