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I have a variable that is not supposed to change its value after it's been initialized, so I want to define it as a final variable.

the problem is that the variable has to be initialized inside a try block, so I get the following troubles:

I have the following code:

Connection conn = null;
try {
    conn = getConn(prefix);
    [...do some stuff with conn...]
} catch (Exception e) {
    throw new DbHelperException("error opening connection", e);
} finally {
    closeConnection(conn);
}

If I declare the variabale as final, without initializing it to null, I get a 'The local variable conn may not have been initialized' on the finally block. On the other hand, if I declare it final and initialize it to null, I get the error 'The final local variable conn cannot be assigned' in the try block.

EDIT: after lxx answer, I came with this version

try {
    final Connection conn = conn = getConn(prefix);
    try {
        return selectAll(conn, sql, params);
    } catch (Exception e) {
        throw new DbHelperException("error executing query", e);
    } finally {
        closeConnection(conn);  
    }
} catch (Exception e) {
    throw new DbHelperException("error opening connection", e);
}

So this should be the way to do it?

--

Lesson learned:

I think that the correct answer to the question is the one that lxx gave, but in this case I guess that the cons of declaring the variable final outweights it's benefits...

--

EDIT: found two questions on stack overflow about when to use final

When should one use final?

Using "final" modifier whenever applicable in java

share|improve this question
    
How about appending final Connection finalConn = conn; to your code? –  biziclop Feb 19 '12 at 15:48
    
Why do you need both trys? Why not just have a single try-catch in which you get the connection and use it to select all? –  yshavit Feb 19 '12 at 16:05
    
I'd question why you think it's so important to declare this as final. It seems rather nannyish and naggy to me. If I were a user, and I called your method to get a connection, I can't see any reason why I'd want to muck that up by changing it. And if I did, I'd argue that the consequences ought to be on the user. –  duffymo Feb 19 '12 at 16:21
    
Agree with duffymo. For a local variable in such a short block of code final is not necessary. –  Ixx Feb 19 '12 at 16:25
    
yshavit: the both tries is the way I've found -thanks to lxx- to keep the variable as final... –  opensas Feb 19 '12 at 16:45

4 Answers 4

up vote 6 down vote accepted

You could handle the Exceptions more accurately. If you get an Exception opening the connection, you don't have to close it in the finally block I guess. If you get an exception after that, in the try block, and handle the exception in a new nested try-catch block you don't need to define the variable outside. Something like:

    try {
        final Connection conn = getConn(prefix);
        try {
            //code using conn
        } catch (Exception e) {

        } finally {
            closeConnection(conn);
        }
    } catch (DbHelperException e) {
        throw new DbHelperException("error opening connection", e);
    }
share|improve this answer
3  
+1, this is probably the cleanest solution. –  biziclop Feb 19 '12 at 16:00
    
Yes, I see what you mean, I assume that if there's an exception opening the connection, the connection couldn't be opened, so there's no need to close it. I came with another version of the code, thanks to your answer, check the question again... –  opensas Feb 19 '12 at 16:03
    
@opensas If there's an exception in the getConn() call, whether the connection was in fact opened or not, conn will definitely be null, so you won't be able to close it anyway. –  biziclop Feb 19 '12 at 19:04

How about this?

Connection temp = null;
try {
    temp = getConn(prefix);
} catch (Exception e) {
    throw new DbHelperException("error opening connection", e);
} finally {
    closeConnection(conn);
}
final Connection conn = temp;
share|improve this answer
    
You could also go ahead and set temp back to null that way you don't use it anymore. –  Michael Feb 19 '12 at 15:56
4  
This is a good way to get a final reference to a connection that is already closed. :) –  biziclop Feb 19 '12 at 15:57
    
@Michael let the JVM to handle it. –  Eng.Fouad Feb 19 '12 at 15:58

Why do you want it final? If you want to pass it to an anonymous inner class, you could do:

Connection conn = null;
try {
    conn = getConn(prefix);
    final Connection finalConn = conn;
    // pass it to inner class here
} catch (Exception e) {
    throw new DbHelperException("error opening connection", e);
} finally {
    closeConnection(conn);
}

The only problem (and quite a big one) with this solution is that you close your connection as soon as you leave this block. So unless you declare and call your anon inner class straight away, this pattern isn't going to work.

Either way, I'd probably rephrase the whole thing if I were you, making prefix final instead and delegating connection handling to the anon inner class.

share|improve this answer
    
oops! you are right, (BTW, you catched a nasty bug, thanks) - updated the question... –  opensas Feb 19 '12 at 15:56
2  
and I want to define it final, just to tell the compiler that the variable conn is not supposed to change it's value after being initialized... –  opensas Feb 19 '12 at 15:58

Can you try assigning it in both the catch and finally blocks? Like so:

Connection connTemp = null;
final Connection conn;
try {
    connTemp = getConn(prefix);
} catch (Exception e) {
    throw new DbHelperException("error opening connection", e);
} finally {
    closeConnection(conn);
}
conn = connTemp;
share|improve this answer
    
once declared as final cannot be changed anywhere, that's the purpose –  Marek Sebera Feb 19 '12 at 15:49
    
Updated it to use a temp variable. –  AlexanderZ Feb 19 '12 at 15:51

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