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I have a two tables, one that contains basic resource info, with columns and values like:

enter image description here

And a separate table of exta associated values with columns and data like:

enter image description here

What I am trying to do is write a SQL query that will join both and produce a result that is ordered by the "order" key, like so:

enter image description here

I am not sure how to make my join work so that I can both pull the location values and then SORT by the order values from that same table.

And before you ask, no I can't redesign the db schema, I have to work with this. Any help greatly appreciated!

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2 Answers 2

up vote 0 down vote accepted

Try this

SELECT t1.RESOURCE_NO
       ,t1.NAME
       ,t2.VALUE
       ,t3.VALUE -- Included so that you can "see" the value
  FROM table1 t1
 INNER JOIN table2 t2
    ON t1.RESOURCE_NO = t2.RESOURCE_NO AND t2.[KEY] = 'location'
 INNER JOIN table2 t3
    ON t1.RESOURCE_NO = t3.RESOURCE_NO AND t3.[KEY] = 'order'
 ORDER BY t3.VALUE ASC
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This general idea should work (tested under Oracle):

SELECT *
FROM TABLE1
    JOIN TABLE2 TABLE2_ORDER
        ON TABLE1.RESOURCE_NO = TABLE2_ORDER.RESOURCE_NO AND TABLE2_ORDER.KEY = 'order'
    JOIN TABLE2 TABLE2_NONORDER
        ON TABLE1.RESOURCE_NO = TABLE2_NONORDER.RESOURCE_NO AND TABLE2_NONORDER.KEY <> 'order'
ORDER BY
    TABLE2_ORDER.VALUE

In plain English:

  • Join to both order and non-order values.
  • An then sort only by order values.

(Of course, this assumes there is exactly one 'order' value per TABLE1 row. If that is not the case, this query will either "multiply" or "erase" rows.)

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there is exactly one order value, I will try this, thanks! –  Stephen Feb 19 '12 at 16:19

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