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I am using PHP Version 5.2.5. I want to be able to compare my own class with int.

abstract class A {

private $value;

    public function __construct($value)
    {
         $this->value = $value;
    }

public function __toString()
{
        return $this->value;
}

}

class B extends A { }

but I want to be able to use my class like this:

$inst = new B(20);
if($inst==20) {
    //...
}

how I can do it?

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possible duplicate of Comparison operator overloading in php – Oliver Charlesworth Feb 19 '12 at 16:53
up vote 3 down vote accepted

You could use a magic __toString() method in your class.

class A 
{ 
    private $value; 

    public function __construct($value)
    {
        $this->value = $value;
    }
    public function __toString() 
    { 
        return (string) $this->value;
    } 

}

$inst = new A(20);  
if((string) $inst==20) {  
    //...  
}

Technically, __toString() must return a string rather than an integer, but PHP's loose typing will make the comparison using standard loose typing comparison rules

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Doesn't work for me in PHP 5.2.12. When I return an int, it says Method A::__toString() must return a string value. When I force-cast the return value as string, the comparison doesn't work (not sure why). Also, it's worth noting that this apparently doesn't work at all in versions before 5.2 – Pekka 웃 Feb 19 '12 at 16:59
1  
It will not work. PHP can't perform indirect casting. You need either 20 to be string, or $inst become string explicitly like that: ((string)$inst == 20) or $inst == (string)20 – Andrew D. Feb 19 '12 at 17:02
    
Sorry, yes! You need to explicitly cast to string both in the __toString() method, and in the comparison. Code example edited appropriately – Mark Baker Feb 19 '12 at 17:12

It's called operator overloading. Yes, you can do it. But you need to use the PECL package (excerpt from description following:

Operator overloading for: +, -, *, /, %, <<, >>, ., |, &, ^, ~, !, ++, --, +=, -=, *=, /=, %=, <<=, >>=, .=, |=, &=, ^=, ~=, ==, !=, ===, !==, <, and <= operators.

)

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