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I have a two dimensional vector array vector<vector<int> > and I need to sort the vectors inside it in order. So... I thought I would write a function which compare two vectors and then use sort()

However I couldn't understand and then was not able to find anywhere the proper syntax for this. Here is my compare function:

bool vectorcompare (vector<int> v, vector<int> w){ 
    for(int i=0; i<v.size(); i++){
        if(v[i]<w[i]) return 1;
        if(v[i]>w[i]) return 0;
    }
    return 1;
}

And then I call sort function, which doesn't work:

sort(vector.begin(),vector.end(), vectorcompare());

Anything I am doing wrong?

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1  
Define "doesn't work". –  Oli Charlesworth Feb 19 '12 at 17:53
    
Ok, I see that the question is misguided, but why is it getting downvoted so badly? It's a beginner question, yes, but it is not effortlessly asking for a ready-made solution. –  Tamás Szelei Feb 19 '12 at 18:18
    
You may not need to write your own comparison function. std::vector already has an operator< defined that performs the equivalent of std::lexicographical_compare. Have you tried simply calling std::sort on your vector<vector> ? –  Blastfurnace Feb 19 '12 at 18:45
    
Interesting. I didn't know that. I will most certainly try to do it this way. –  user1219520 Feb 19 '12 at 18:50
    
Yes. It works just without any extra function. How do I find out things like this? operator< for std::vector is not mentioned in here for example. –  user1219520 Feb 19 '12 at 19:11

3 Answers 3

First, your compile error:

sort(vector.begin(),vector.end(), vectorcompare());

vectorcompare is a function, not a type. That is, it's not an object that you can construct. So you don't do () on it; you just pass the function as is:

sort(vector.begin(),vector.end(), vectorcompare);

Now, for a worse problem:

bool vectorcompare (vector<int> v, vector<int> w)

Take your parameters by const&, not by value. std::vectors are big; you shouldn't needlessly copy them.

And an even worse problem:

for(int i=0; i<v.size(); i++){
    if(v[i]<w[i]) return 1;
    if(v[i]>w[i]) return 0;
}
return 1;

This does not constitute a strict-weak ordering. This provides less than or equals to, which is not a strict-weak ordering. std::sort requires sorting based on a strict-weak ordering.

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Oh... ok. I will go and think about it, thank you! At least it compiles without errors now –  user1219520 Feb 19 '12 at 18:08

You may not need to write your own comparison function. std::vector already has an operator< defined that performs the equivalent of std::lexicographical_compare. Have you tried simply calling std::sort on your vector<vector>?

Note: added my comment as this answer because the user found it helpful.

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Please look at this site, it has a nice example.

In your case, you would call std::sort like this:

sort(vector.begin(),vector.end(), vectorcompare);
share|improve this answer
    
Yes, I looked there before. So, it looks like my function should work. There are many discussions on this website with examples like bool compare(const vector<int> &v, const vector<int> &w) I didn't understand why, and wasn't sure if I did it right. –  user1219520 Feb 19 '12 at 18:03

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