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Background

In my utilities library (Shd.dll) I have a class called AsyncOperation. To put it simply, it's a base class for types that encapsulate a potentially long running operation, executes it on a background thread, and it supports pause/resume, cancellation and progress reporting. (It's like a BackgroundWorker, just knows more things.)

In the user code you can use it like this:

class MyOperation : AsyncOperation
{
    public MyOperation() : base(null, AsyncOperationOptions.Cancelable | AsyncOperationOptions.Pausable) {}

    protected override void RunOperation(AsyncOperationState operationState, object userState)
    {
         ...
         operationState.ThrowIfCancelled();
    }
}

 var op = new MyOperation();
 op.Start();
 ...
 op.Cancel();

operationState.ThrowIfCancelled() does exactly what its name suggests: if Cancel() was called earlier by another thread, it throws an internal exception (AsyncOperationCancelException), which is then handled by the AsyncOperation type, like this:

private void _DoExecute(object state)
{
    // note that this method is already executed on the background thread
    ...
    try
    {
        operationDelegate.DynamicInvoke(args); // this is where RunOperation() is called
    }
    catch(System.Reflection.TargetInvocationException tiex)
    {
        Exception inner = tiex.InnerException;
        var cancelException = inner as AsyncOperationCancelException;
        if(cancelException != null)
        {
             // the operation was cancelled
             ...
        }
        else
        {
            // the operation faulted
            ...
        }
        ...
    }
    ...
}

This works perfectly. Or so I thought for the past year, while I was using this in numerous scenarios.

The actual problem

I'm building a class that uses System.Net.WebClient to upload potentially large number of files via FTP. This class is built using the AsyncOperation base class as described above.

For accurate progress reports, I use WebClient.UploadFileAsync(), which complicates the code, but the relevant parts look like this:

private ManualResetEventSlim completedEvent = new ManualResetEventSlim(false);

private void WebClient_UploadProgressChanged(object sender, UploadProgressChangedEventArgs e)
{
    ...
    if (OperationState.IsCancellationRequested)
    {
        _GetCurrentWebClient().CancelAsync();
    }
}

private void WebClient_UploadFileCompleted(object sender, UploadFileCompletedEventArgs e)
{
    ...
    _UploadNextFile();
}

private void _UploadNextFile()
{
    if (OperationState.IsCancellationRequested || ...)
    {
        this.completedEvent.Set();
        return;
    }
    ...
}

protected override void RunOperation(AsyncOperationState operationState, object userState)
{
    ...
    _UploadNextFile();
    this.completedEvent.Wait();

    operationState.ThrowIfCancelled(); // crash
    ...
}

As you can see, I marked the line where the crash occurs. What exactly happens is that when execution hits that line (I put a break point right over it, so I know this is the exact line), Visual Studio 2010 freezes for about 15 seconds, and then the next thing I see is the source code of AsyncOperationState.ThrowIfCancelled():

public void ThrowIfCancelled()
{
    if(IsCancellationRequested)
    {
        throw new AsyncOperationCancelException();
    }
} // this is the line the debugger highlights: "An exception of type AsyncOperationCancelException' occured in Shd.dll but was unhandled by user code."

I tried putting breakpoints to where the exception should have been caught, but the execution never reaches that catch {} block.

The other weird this is that at the end it also writes the following: "Function evaluation disabled because a previous function evaluation timed out." I Googled this problem, and tried everything that was suggested (disabled implicit property evaluation, removed all breakpoints), but nothing helped so far.

Here are two screenshots that illustrate the problem:
http://dl.dropbox.com/u/17147594/vsd1.png
http://dl.dropbox.com/u/17147594/vsd2.png

I'm using .NET 4.0. Any help would be very much appreciated.

share|improve this question
    
Might be a problem with symbol download. This is a frequent issue of hangs. Run fiddler to see if VS is downloading anything. –  usr Feb 19 '12 at 23:54
    
@usr: but that still wouldn't explain the exception avoiding the catch block, does it? –  ShdNx Feb 20 '12 at 9:40
    
No it doesn't. Just trying to narrow in on the problem. –  usr Feb 20 '12 at 9:47
1  
If you are running the application with VS debugger attached, Managed Debuggin Assistant will break the execution when an exception happens. If you press F5 in that moment, it will let the exception propagate to the first catch block. –  Groo Feb 20 '12 at 12:19
    
@Groo: It would appear that you have the solution. If I press F5, the exception propagates and is caught correctly. What I don't understand is that why it happens here? As far as I can tell, the IDE doesn't behave like that elsewhere. Anyway, you solved the "issue", so please post a reply that I can accept as solution. –  ShdNx Feb 20 '12 at 13:47

3 Answers 3

up vote 4 down vote accepted

When the Visual Studio debugger is attached to an application, it gets notified whenever an exception is thrown, before the running code gets the chance to handle it. This is called a first-chance exception, and VS can be configured to break execution when a certain exception type is thrown.

You can specify debugger behavior for each exception type separately using the Exceptions window (Debug menu). By default, all exceptions have the "User-unhandled" checkbox checked, meaning that only unhandled exceptions will break execution. Setting the "Thrown" checkbox for a certain exception type forces VS to break execution even if the exception will be handled, but only for that exception type (not for derived types). If a handler exists, once you resume execution (by pressing F5), the exception will be caught normally.

I would guess that your custom exception was added to the list of exceptions in the Exceptions window (which you can check by using the Find button inside the window).

[Edit]

According to my tests, it also happens when DynamicInvoke is used in .NET 4, regardless of the Exceptions window setting. Yesterday I was using VS2008 and I couldn't reproduce it, but it does seem like odd behavior now.

This is the test I tried (sorry for the brief formatting, but it's fairly simple):

Action<int> a = i => { throw new ArgumentException(); };

// When the following code is executed, VS2010 debugger
// will break on the `ArgumentException` above 
// but ONLY if the target is .NET 4 (3.5 and lower don't break)
try { a.DynamicInvoke(5); }
catch (Exception ex)
{ }

// this doesn't break
try { a.Invoke(5); }
catch (Exception ex)
{ }

// neither does this
try { a(5); }
catch (Exception ex)
{ }

My only guess is that exception handling done inside InvokeMethodFast (which is an InternalCall method) has somehow changed. DynamicInvoke code has changed between versions 4 and prior, but there is nothing which would indicate why VS2010 debugger is unable to see that there is an exception handler inside that method call.

share|improve this answer
    
You are correct in that execution resumes as expected upon hitting F5. So you've solved my problem, therefore I accepted your answer. However, my exception type is definitely NOT in the Debug -> Exceptions list. Also, this doesn't happen in any other scenarios: I wrote a tiny application in attempt to reproduce the issue in a simplified environment, but everything went perfectly. What else could cause such behavior from the VS 2010 debugger? If you can answer that, you'll also get an upvote. –  ShdNx Feb 22 '12 at 17:02
    
@ShdNx: I presumed that you didn't specify it explicitly, that's why I posted my comment before answering this. I cannot say why it happens, but I've updated my answer with my findings. Since your test app didn't reproduce it, I would like to hear your opinion. –  Groo Feb 22 '12 at 17:38
    
your edit now explains it. I used an older project (ConsoleApplicationN) to quickly run a test and I wasn't paying attention to the target framework. I changed it to .NET 4 and was able to reproduce the issue. Nonetheless, this issue is still weird, but now at least I know what causes it. Thank you very much for your help! –  ShdNx Feb 22 '12 at 18:07

“a function evaluation has timed out”

You don't have a real problem, this is a debugger artifact. It is triggered by the way the debugger evaluates watch expressions. When you start a .NET program with the debugger attached, the program will have a dedicated thread, solely for use by the debugger. Whenever the debugger needs to evaluate a watch expression, it uses that thread to execute the expression code. The result is then displayed in the watch window.

Which works very well and gives the debugger a lot of capabilities. Including calling a method in your program when a breakpoint is active. Rather necessary, a lot of object values you'd be interested in are exposed as properties. Which are implemented as methods in the generated code.

That debugger thread can however cause trouble. An obvious case is where you try to evaluate a property that takes a lock. If you break execution at a stage where that lock is owned by another thread then the debugger thread is going to hit a brick wall. It trundles for a while, notices that the debugger thread isn't completing, then gives up and displays "a function evaluation has timed out" as the watch value. It also remembers that it failed, any watches you try later will produce "Function evaluation disabled because a previous function evaluation timed out". Necessarily so, the debugger thread is still stuck in a rut.

Similar kind of problem in your code. The probable scenario there is that the thread you need to get the operation completed got suspended by the debugger break. The only decent advice to give here is to be careful with your watch expressions.

share|improve this answer
    
When I initially Googled my problem, I found a thread that mentioned this issue. I have followed their advice, and disabled implicit evaluations (and deleted all watched variables). This didn't help, so I have also removed all breakpoints, and that hasn't resolved the issue either. Your explanation makes sense, except there's nothing for the debugger to evaluate here. And that still doesn't explain how the exception "escapes" the catch block. –  ShdNx Feb 20 '12 at 13:31
    
Well, I don't know, perhaps you ought to work from the assumption that you have two problems. First one a real one, an uncaught exception. Which then got you into trouble with the debugger thread when you tried to inspect stuff. –  Hans Passant Feb 20 '12 at 13:39

If your try catch logic is running on a different thread than the code that actually throws the exception, then the catch block will never execute.

Consider the following sample:

class Program
{
    static void Main(string[] args)
    {
        try
        {
            Thread thread = new Thread((s) =>
                {
                    throw new Exception("Blah");
                });

            thread.Start();
        }
        catch (Exception ex)
        {
            Console.WriteLine("Exception caught: {0}", ex);
        }

        Console.ReadKey();
    }
}

The catch block of course does not execute since the exception was thrown on a different thread. Console crashes!

I'm suspecting that you could be experiencing something similar. If you want your catch block to execute, it must be on the same thread that the error is being thrown on.

Good luck!

share|improve this answer
    
You're correct, but this is not the case here. Both the exception throwing code (ThrowIfCancelled(), indirectly RunOperation()) and the exception handling code (_DoExecute()) are in the same thread (the background thread). –  ShdNx Feb 20 '12 at 12:16
    
@ShdNx: where is the code for _DoExecute? (And btw, I have never seen method names beginning with underscore in C# project until now) –  Groo Feb 20 '12 at 12:26
    
@Groo: I have edited the question with more detailed code. Using underscores is just convention, indicating that the element is private. –  ShdNx Feb 20 '12 at 13:38
    
@ShdNx What is the value of operationDelegate and what does it execute when DynamicInvoke is called? –  Anastasiosyal Feb 20 '12 at 14:26
    
@Anastasiosyal: in this case, it simply points to this.RunOperation(AsyncOperationState, object). That is the method called. –  ShdNx Feb 20 '12 at 21:07

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