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I asked this same question on javaprogrammingforums.com but it seems their website is down right now. So I couldn't see what responses (if any) I got. Anyways, I am badly stuck on this Java HW assignment. What I have so far looks good in terms of completion, now it's just getting the right values to appear. Pretend I have this:

(This is only part of the 2nd class of the two with the constructor, the other is the "tester")

//private variables
boolean myP;
boolean myPla;
boolean myGl;
boolean myCa;

double myPlot;
int myCrust;

double myReduct;
double myNet;
double myGross;

boolean [] trshIt = {myP, myPla, myGl, myCa};
double [] CO2TrashEmissions = {184.0, 25.6, 46.6, 165.8};

//constructor
CO2FromWaste(int crust, boolean p, boolean pl, boolean gl, boolean ca)
{
    myPlot = 1018.0;
    myCrust = crust;
    myP = p;
    myPl = pl;
    myGl = gl;
    myCa = ca;
}

My issue is that boolean array, trshIt. Since I am putting variables in the array that have not been initialized yet, it gives those variables default values of false. If I put it in the constructor first, then I get an error complaining that the variable trshIt can not be found; pointing to the instance that I am calling that variable. So I have tried different forms of it in different areas and I am like trapped in a maze right now trying to get that array to work properly. I need all the help I can get. Ideas?

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Don't post the same question on multiple places. Also, you've added many tags, except for the most important one: "Java"... –  Rob W Feb 19 '12 at 19:16
    
Um. Well the other forum I was on is down, this is my first thread on here...And I'll fix the tags. –  Michael Feb 19 '12 at 19:18
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3 Answers 3

up vote 0 down vote accepted

Declare trshIt as a member of the class, but initialize it in the constructor, like this:

boolean [] trshIt;
double [] CO2TrashEmissions = {184.0, 25.6, 46.6, 165.8};

//constructor
CO2FromWaste(int crust, boolean p, boolean pl, boolean gl, boolean ca)
{
    myPlot = 1018.0;
    myCrust = crust;
    myP = p;
    myPl = pl;
    myGl = gl;
    myCa = ca;

    trshIt = new boolean[4];
    trshIt[0] = myP;
    trshIt[1] = myPla;
    trshIt[2] = myGl;
    trshIt[3] = myCa;
}
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Hmm, good try, although I have tried that and I get an 'illegal start of expression' error right before the first squiggly bracket on the trshIt array. And it's unclear to me why I get this. –  Michael Feb 19 '12 at 19:23
    
You might need trshIt = new boolean[] {myP, myPla, myGl, myCa}; –  Louis Wasserman Feb 19 '12 at 19:30
    
you can use the shortcut array notation only when you declare the variable, ie you can do boolean[] a = {true, false}; but not boolean[] a; a = {true, false}; –  scibuff Feb 19 '12 at 19:31
    
Ooops. Ok. Edited to fix that. –  Diego Feb 19 '12 at 19:37
    
IT WORKED! Although I had to change boolean [] trshIt; to boolean [] trshIt = new boolean [4]; and added what you put in by assigning each index the variable in the constructor. Finally getting the magic on the terminal. –  Michael Feb 19 '12 at 19:54
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It doesn't work because trshIt will get its values from the fields before they are initialised in the constructor.

Initialising trshIt in the constructor after every other variable should work.

Also, as CO2TrashEmissions is constant by looks of it (and maybe myPlot too?), you should probably declare it static and final to prevent it from changing. Though it won't prevent modifications to the elements themselves.

private static final double[] CO2TrashEmissions = {184.0, 25.6, 46.6, 165.8};
//Fields....
boolean[] trshIt;

//constructor
CO2FromWaste(int crust, boolean p, boolean pl, boolean gl, boolean ca)
{
    myPlot = 1018.0;
    myCrust = crust;
    myP = p;
    myPl = pl;
    myGl = gl;
    myCa = ca;

    trshIt = new boolean[]{myP, myPla, myGl, myCa};
}

Also, note that since booleans are literals, changing one of your my* variables won't change the corresponding element in the array which may be a problem depending on what your program is doing.

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I'm mainly just utilizing arrayLists to calculate and print information. The boolean variables did change as they should. I don't think I'm allowed to utilize terms like static and final in the script since it wasn't taught to me yet. But trust me, if I could, I would have been all over it. The more usable things the better. I will reference this if I am in a similar situation and I am building scripts for the heck of it. –  Michael Feb 19 '12 at 20:04
    
I meant outside the constructor when you modify the fields using methods to manipulate the object-- You're bound to learn about it later on in your course. Good luck and don't hesitate to learn more than you need to. –  Hedja Feb 19 '12 at 20:17
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Any reason you can't do this:

//private variables
boolean myP;
boolean myPla;
boolean myGl;
boolean myCa;

double myPlot;
int myCrust;

double myReduct;
double myNet;
double myGross;

boolean [] trshIt;
double [] CO2TrashEmissions;

//constructor
CO2FromWaste(int crust, boolean p, boolean pl, boolean gl, boolean ca){

    myPlot = 1018.0;
    myCrust = crust;
    myP = p;
    myPl = pl;
    myGl = gl;
    myCa = ca;
    trshIt = new boolean[4];
    trshIt[0] = myP; trshIt[1] = myPla;
    trshIt[2] = myGl; trshIt[3] = myCa;

    double [] CO2TrashEmissions = {184.0, 25.6, 46.6, 165.8};
}

In Java, primitives (int, char, boolean) are assigned by value, so if you do

boolean b = true;
boolean[] a = { b };
b = false;

System.out.println( ( a[0] == true ) ? "true" : "false" );

will print "true" because b = false; doesn't change the value in the a array (because it doesn't store the "pointer" to b, but the value that was in b.

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Hmm, I did your style and I managed to get passed that first error. But running the script I now receive an error that trshIt is null when I ask for the length of it in a for loop. Even looking at the value of it in the debugger it reports that it's null. I never had anything like that before. Thoughts? Thanks for helping me through error 1 by the way. –  Michael Feb 19 '12 at 19:37
    
It can be null only if this specific constructor is not called. Do you have more than one constructor or do you use new CO2FromWaste() instead of new CO2FromWaste( crust, p, pl, gl, ca ) anywhere? –  scibuff Feb 19 '12 at 19:48
    
I only have one constructor, and I used new CO2FromWaste with the parameters several times as objects in an arraylist. –  Michael Feb 19 '12 at 19:50
    
@Michael: You should accept this answer, and post another question with the code that is causing the new problem. –  Skip Head Feb 19 '12 at 19:51
    
Don't worry, It's figure out now. Thank you user1000959. (can't do the useful answer thing yet) –  Michael Feb 19 '12 at 19:56
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