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A y-combinator is a comp-sci concept from the "functional" side of things. Most programmers don't know much at all about them, if they've even heard about them.

What is a y-combinator? How do they work? What are they good for? Are they useful in procedural languages?

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2  
Bit of a tip, if you are learning about functional languages like I do, better leave combinators until you get comfortable with it, otherwise it's a road to madness... –  Igor Zevaka Feb 4 '10 at 22:59
3  
Got to smile at the gravatar of the editor of this question :) Related link on Mads Torgensen's blog –  Benjol Oct 4 '11 at 11:15
    
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15 Answers 15

up vote 127 down vote accepted

If you're ready for a long read, Mike Vanier has a great explanation. Long story short, it allows you to implement recursion in a language that doesn't necessarily support it natively.

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A Y-combinator is a "functional" (a function that operates on other functions) that enables recursion, when you can't refer to the function from within itself. In computer-science theory, it generalizes recursion, abstracting its implementation, and thereby separating it from the actual work of the function in question. The benefit of not needing a compile-time name for the recursive function is sort of a bonus. =)

This is applicable in languages that support lambda functions. The expression-based nature of lambdas usually means that they cannot refer to themselves by name. And working around this by way of declaring the variable, refering to it, then assigning the lambda to it, to complete the self-reference loop, is brittle. The lambda variable can be copied, and the original variable re-assigned, which breaks the self-reference.

Y-combinators are cumbersome to implement, and often to use, in static-typed languages (which procedural languages often are), because usually typing restrictions require the number of arguments for the function in question to be known at compile time. This means that a y-combinator must be written for any argument count that one needs to use.

Below is an example of how the usage and working of a Y-Combinator, in C#.

Using a Y-combinator involves an "unusual" way of constructing a recursive function. First you must write your function as a piece of code that calls a pre-existing function, rather than itself:

// Factorial, if func does the same thing as this bit of code...
x == 0 ? 1: x * func(x - 1);

Then you turn that into a function that takes a function to call, and returns a function that does so. This is called a functional, because it takes one function, and performs an operation with it that results in another function.

// A function that creates a factorial, but only if you pass in
// a function that does what the inner function is doing.
Func<Func<Double, Double>, Func<Double, Double>> fact =
  (recurs) =>
    (x) =>
      x == 0 ? 1 : x * recurs(x - 1);

Now you have a function that takes a function, and returns another function that sort of looks like a factorial, but instead of calling itself, it calls the argument passed into the outer function. How do you make this the factorial? Pass the inner function to itself. The Y-Combinator does that, by being a function with a permanent name, which can introduce the recursion.

// One-argument Y-Combinator.
public static Func<T, TResult> Y<T, TResult>(Func<Func<T, TResult>, Func<T, TResult>> F)
{
  return
    t =>  // A function that...
      F(  // Calls the factorial creator, passing in...
        Y(F)  // The result of this same Y-combinator function call...
              // (Here is where the recursion is introduced.)
        )
      (t); // And passes the argument into the work function.
}

Rather than the factorial calling itself, what happens is that the factorial calls the factorial generator (returned by the recursive call to Y-Combinator). And depending on the current value of t the function returned from the generator will either call the generator again, with t - 1, or just return 1, terminating the recursion.

It's complicated and cryptic, but it all shakes out at run-time, and the key to its working is "deferred execution", and the breaking up of the recursion to span two functions. The inner F is passed as an argument, to be called in the next iteration, only if necessary.

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This is an excellent explanation! Thanks. –  asgerhallas Apr 26 '10 at 21:16
    
Why oh why did you have to call it 'Y' and the parameter 'F'! They just gets lost in the type arguments! –  Brian Henk Jul 15 '11 at 23:55
    
The first time I actually understand it! Thanks a lot. –  erikb85 Jul 16 '11 at 7:44
    
In Haskell, you can abstraction recursion with: fix :: (a -> a) -> a, and the a can in turn be a function of as many arguments as you'd like. This means that static typing doesn't really make this cumbersome. –  Peaker Jul 17 '11 at 14:35
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According to Mike Vanier's description, your definition for Y is actually not a combinator because it's recursive. Under "Eliminating (most) explicit recursion (lazy version)" he has the lazy scheme equivalent of your C# code but explains in point 2: "It is not a combinator, because the Y in the body of the definition is a free variable which is only bound once the definition is complete..." I think the cool thing about Y-combinators is that they produce recursion by evaluating the fixed-point of a function. In this way, they don't need explicit recursion. –  GrantJ Jul 18 '11 at 0:02
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I've lifted this from http://www.mail-archive.com/boston-pm@mail.pm.org/msg02716.html which is an explanation I wrote several years ago.

I'll use JavaScript in this example, but many other languages will work as well.

Our goal is to be able to write a recursive function of 1 variable using only functions of 1 variables and no assignments, defining things by name, etc. (Why this is our goal is another question, let's just take this as the challenge that we're given.) Seems impossible, huh? As an example, let's implement factorial.

Well step 1 is to say that we could do this easily if we cheated a little. Using functions of 2 variables and assignment we can at least avoid having to use assignment to set up the recursion.

// Here's the function that we want to recurse.
X = function (recurse, n) {
  if (0 == n)
    return 1;
  else
    return n * recurse(recurse, n - 1);
};

// This will get X to recurse.
Y = function (builder, n) {
  return builder(builder, n);
};

// Here it is in action.
Y(
  X,
  5
);

Now let's see if we can cheat less. Well firstly we're using assignment, but we don't need to. We can just write X and Y inline.

// No assignment this time.
function (builder, n) {
  return builder(builder, n);
}(
  function (recurse, n) {
    if (0 == n)
      return 1;
    else
      return n * recurse(recurse, n - 1);
  },
  5
);

But we're using functions of 2 variables to get a function of 1 variable. Can we fix that? Well a smart guy by the name of Haskell Curry has a neat trick, if you have good higher order functions then you only need functions of 1 variable. The proof is that you can get from functions of 2 (or more in the general case) variables to 1 variable with a purely mechanical text transformation like this:

// Original
F = function (i, j) {
  ...
};
F(i,j);

// Transformed
F = function (i) { return function (j) {
  ...
}};
F(i)(j);

where ... remains exactly the same. (This trick is called "currying" after its inventor. The language Haskell is also named for Haskell Curry. File that under useless trivia.) Now just apply this transformation everywhere and we get our final version.

// The dreaded Y-combinator in action!
function (builder) { return function (n) {
  return builder(builder)(n);
}}(
  function (recurse) { return function (n) {
    if (0 == n)
      return 1;
    else
      return n * recurse(recurse)(n - 1);
  }})(
  5
);

Feel free to try it. alert() that return, tie it to a button, whatever. That code calculates factorials, recursively, without using assignment, declarations, or functions of 2 variables. (But trying to trace how it works is likely to make your head spin. And handing it, without the derivation, just slightly reformatted will result in code that is sure to baffle and confuse.)

You can replace the 4 lines that recursively define factorial with any other recursive function that you want.

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Excellent explanation! Nice and clear. Congrats! –  Randomblue Dec 18 '11 at 20:09
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I wonder if there's any use in attempting to build this from the ground up. Let's see. Here's a basic, recursive factorial function:

function factorial(n) {
    return n == 0 ? 1 : n * factorial(n - 1);
}

Let's refactor and create a new function called fact that returns an anonymous factorial-computing function instead of performing the calculation itself:

function fact() {
    return function(n) {
        return n == 0 ? 1 : n * fact()(n - 1);
    };
}

var factorial = fact();

That's a little weird, but there's nothing wrong with it. We're just generating a new factorial function at each step.

The recursion at this stage is still fairly explicit. The fact function needs to be aware of its own name. Let's parameterize the recursive call:

function fact(recurse) {
    return function(n) {
        return n == 0 ? 1 : n * recurse(n - 1);
    };
}

function recurser(x) {
    return fact(recurser)(x);
}

var factorial = fact(recurser);

That's great, but recurser still needs to know its own name. Let's parameterize that, too:

function recurser(f) {
    return fact(function(x) {
        return f(f)(x);
    });
}

var factorial = recurser(recurser);

Now, instead of calling recurser(recurser) directly, let's create a wrapper function that returns its result:

function Y() {
    return (function(f) {
        return f(f);
    })(recurser);
}

var factorial = Y();

We can now get rid of the recurser name altogether; it's just an argument to Y's inner function, which can be replaced with the function itself:

function Y() {
    return (function(f) {
        return f(f);
    })(function(f) {
        return fact(function(x) {
            return f(f)(x);
        });
    });
}

var factorial = Y();

The only external name still referenced is fact, but it should be clear by now that that's easily parameterized, too, creating the complete, generic, solution:

function Y(le) {
    return (function(f) {
        return f(f);
    })(function(f) {
        return le(function(x) {
            return f(f)(x);
        });
    });
}

var factorial = Y(function(recurse) {
    return function(n) {
        return n == 0 ? 1 : n * recurse(n - 1);
    };
});
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should start like: return n <= 2 ? (n == 2 ? 2 : 1) : n * factorial(n - 1); for correct answer 0->1 :). anyway, nice to see the evolution. –  f3r3nc Jul 16 '11 at 9:27
    
@f3r3nc - Thanks. Fixed. –  lwburk Jul 16 '11 at 20:24
    
A similar explanation in JavaScript: igstan.ro/posts/… –  Pops May 2 '12 at 6:08
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y-combinator in JavaScript:

var Y = function(f) {
  return (function(g) {
    return g(g);
  })(function(h) {
    return function() {
      return f(h(h)).apply(null, arguments);
    };
  });
};

var factorial = Y(function(recurse) {
  return function(x) {
    return x == 0 ? 1 : x * recurse(x-1);
  };
});

factorial(5)  // -> 120

Edit: I learn a lot from looking at code, but this one is a bit tough to swallow without some background - sorry about that. With some general knowledge presented by other answers, you can begin to pick apart what is happening.

The Y function is the "y-combinator". Now take a look at the var factorial line where Y is used. Notice you pass a function to it that has a parameter (in this example, recurse) that is also used later on in the inner function. The parameter name basically becomes the name of the inner function allowing it to perform a recursive call (since it uses recurse() in it's definition.) The y-combinator performs the magic of associating the otherwise anonymous inner function with the parameter name of the function passed to Y.

For the full explanation of how Y does the magic, checked out the linked article (not by me btw.)

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looks confyoozing! intent of code not clear –  DarenW Sep 19 '08 at 3:35
6  
Javascript doesn't need a Y-combinator to do anonymous recursion because you can access the current function with arguments.callee (see en.wikipedia.org/wiki/…) –  xitrium Sep 30 '10 at 1:09
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arguments.callee is not allowed in Strict Mode: developer.mozilla.org/en/JavaScript/… –  dave1010 May 16 '11 at 9:52
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You can still give any function a name, and if it's function expression then that name is only known inside the function itself. (function fact(n){ return n <= 1? 1 : n * fact(n-1); })(5) –  Esailija Aug 7 '12 at 16:50
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Most of the answers above describe what the Y-combinator is but not what it is for.

Fixed point combinators are used to show that lambda calculus is turing complete. This is a very important result in the theory of computation and provides a theoretical foundation for functional programming.

Studying fixed point combinators has also helped me really understand functional programming. I have never found any use for them in actual programming though.

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Thank you--- I was getting frustrated by the lack of "why?" answers. –  Jim Pivarski Sep 15 '13 at 21:14
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Other answers provide pretty concise answer to this, without one important fact: You don't need to implement fixed point combinator in any practical language in this convoluted way and doing so serves no practical purpose (except "look, I know what Y-combinator is"). It's important theoretical concept, but of little practical value.

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You may find this helpful: I've explained and derived Y combinator in JavaScript at a JSZurich meet-up. Here's the video http://vimeo.com/21795367

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Just watched it. Really great. Thanks! –  slacktracer Sep 9 '12 at 16:06
    
Thank you! Glad you liked it. –  Ivan Krechetov Sep 9 '12 at 17:49
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A Y-Combinator is another name for a flux capacitor.

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very funny. :) young(er) ones might not recognize the reference though. –  Will Ness Jun 7 '13 at 4:18
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+1 for saving the day from banality! –  necromancer Jul 15 '13 at 7:58
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A fixed point combinator (or fixed-point operator) is a higher-order function that computes a fixed point of other functions. This operation is relevant in programming language theory because it allows the implementation of recursion in the form of a rewrite rule, without explicit support from the language's runtime engine. (src Wikipedia)

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Here is a JavaScript implementation of the Y-Combinator and the Factorial function (from Douglas Crockford's article, available at: http://javascript.crockford.com/little.html).

function Y(le) {
    return (function (f) {
        return f(f);
    }(function (f) {
        return le(function (x) {
            return f(f)(x);
        });
    }));
}

var factorial = Y(function (fac) {
    return function (n) {
        return n <= 2 ? n : n * fac(n - 1);
    };
});

var number120 = factorial(5);
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The y-combinator implements anonymous recursion. So instead of

function fib( n ){ if( n<=1 ) return n; else return fib(n-1)+fib(n-2) }

you can do

function ( fib, n ){ if( n<=1 ) return n; else return fib(n-1)+fib(n-2) }

of course, the y-combinator only works in call-by-name languages. If you want to use this in any normal call-by-value language, then you will need the related z-combinator (y-combinator will diverge/infinite-loop).

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I have written a sort of "idiots guide" to the Y-Combinator in both Clojure and Scheme in order to help myself come to grips with it. They are influenced by material in "The Little Schemer"

In Scheme: https://gist.github.com/z5h/238891

or Clojure: https://gist.github.com/z5h/5102747

Both tutorials are code interspersed with comments and should be cut & pastable into your favourite editor.

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For cross referencing here is an implementation of a Y Combinator in Lua.

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This question was removed from Stack Overflow for reasons of moderation. –  Vi. Sep 7 '13 at 21:20
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I've written a blog post about the Y combinator, explaining it from another approach. It may be helpful: http://x-yz.net/the-y-combinator/

And this: http://x-yz.net/the-imperative-y-combinator/

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