Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

This is a follow-up to the following question: Executing ssh command in a bash shell script within a loop

I am doing a similar job:

while read line
do
   ssh -n root@$line 'command'
   do something
done

The problem is that I want to execute the "do something" part only when the execution of 'command' is complete in the previous ssh line ie I want to wait till the background ssh completes. I can use sleep, but this does not suit my application. Please guide me.

I dont want to particularly run ssh in the background. I am only doing this so that my loop runs properly. As given in Executing ssh command in a bash shell script within a loop if we dont give -n flag, the loop terminates after first ssh command execution.

share|improve this question
    
The problem is solved. A little bit of googling help me: while read line do ssh root@$line 'command' < /dev/null do something done In this way, there is no need of -n flag. For more details: 72.14.189.113/howto/shell/while-ssh –  Pinnacle Feb 19 '12 at 20:44

2 Answers 2

If your command is not run in the background, executing ssh server command will wait for that command to finish. For example, try this:

ssh server "sleep 3"
echo finished

This will print "finished" after sleep 3 actually executed on the remote server (i.e. after 3 seconds).

Try this - make three files in ~/tmp - called lines, parent.sh and child.sh. For a test, make them on some machine that has sshd running, so you can use ssh localhost instead of ssh server. Put this in them:

  • lines

    line1
    line2
    line3
    
  • parent.sh

    while read l; do
      echo next line
      ssh -n localhost "~/tmp/child.sh $l"
    done < lines
    echo parent
    
  • child.sh

    echo child processing: $1
    sleep 2
    echo child done
    

When you run parent:

$ cd ~/tmp
$ ./parent.sh

the output will be this:

next line
child processing: line1
child done
next line
child processing: line2
child done
next line
child processing: line3
child done
parent

which shows that child will execute before the parent will continue processing a next line. You will see a 2 second sleep (a result of sleep 2 executing in the child.sh) between "child processing" and "child done" lines.

Note that ssh -n is not for running ssh in the background - it's for not consuming stdin. To run ssh in background, ssh -f can be used - see man ssh.

share|improve this answer
    
I have edited the question and added why I am executing ssh in the background. I want to somehow either find a way so that loop runs without ssh being run in the background, or some way to detect completion of this ssh process. –  Pinnacle Feb 19 '12 at 20:20
    
See my edit - please try what I put there to see if that works as you expect. –  icyrock.com Feb 19 '12 at 20:36
    
You are right - -n helps to consume stdin. I have used /dev/null to read input from, and code runs fine without -n. –  Pinnacle Feb 19 '12 at 20:40
up vote 0 down vote accepted

A little bit of googling help me:

while read line
do
   ssh root@$line 'command' < /dev/null
   do something
done

In this way, there is no need of -n flag. For more details: http://72.14.189.113/howto/shell/while-ssh/

share|improve this answer
    
There should be no problem with the -n flag - it still runs in the foreground with it, unlike the -f flag. –  glglgl Feb 20 '12 at 15:43

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.