Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

So I'm making a website for a friend of mine who's a lawyer. He gave me a reference to another site the layout of which he liked, and asked me if I could "make his similar to that one". The reference site is probably 10 years old and done with 5-levels-deep nested tables so I decided to use CSS like a good web developer. Now the problem is that he wants a two-column layout with a header, but one in which one column overlaps the header and one doesn't. I laid the site out like this:

<html style="min-height: 100%">
<head>...</head>
<body style="min-height: 100%">
  <div id="left" style="height: 100% !important">
    ...stuff...
  </div>
  <div id="header">
    ...stuff...
  </div>
  <div id="right" style="height: 100% !important">
    ...stuff...
  </div>
</body></html>

Everything uses relative positioning and percentage or auto height/width. Now the main problem is that both #left and #right, just as expected, have a height that is 100% of the page. The problem is that the #right div is pushed down bu the #header div that's right on top of it, so there's some extra room at the bottom of the page that is occupied only by the #right div. Is there a way around this? I've considered changing the style of #header to have a percentage height and subtracting that from the height of #right, but that seems kludgy to me (on top of which it'll probably break IE).

Thanks in advance!

share|improve this question
    
Can you give a little more html code? I cannot understand your problem nor reproduce it. –  andreapier Feb 19 '12 at 21:57

1 Answer 1

up vote 1 down vote accepted

First off, I don't suggest using min-height:100% for anything. Just use height:100%. min-height is supposed to be used mainly for a pixel or em value. using % with min-height defeats the purpose, you can't have a minimum height equal to a percentage of your screen.

I would use the 1140 grid system. It's easy to use, very flexible, and can make your layout easy and quick to design.

Using the 1140 grid system try this:

<div class="container">   
    <div class="row">
        <div class="twelvecol">
            <p>Header area!!!!</p>
        </div>
    </div>
</div>
<div class="container">   
    <div class="row">
        <div class="sixcol">
            <p>left column</p>
        </div>
        <div class="sixcol last">
            <p>right column</p>
        </div>
    </div>
</div>

There you go, problem solved.

share|improve this answer
1  
This is cool; I was hoping more for a way to not have to split my content into rows but I might think of restructuring since this looks so easy. –  Actorclavilis Feb 19 '12 at 22:38
    
yep! With 1140gs, you can do a lot of templating very quickly! Glad you enjoy it. You can split most websites into rows without to much of an issue. Honestly you could just use the header as one row, and the rest of the content as another row, and maybe a footer row. That way you don't really have to deal with using rows, but its a well organized site. –  Tyler.Exposure Feb 19 '12 at 23:18

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.