Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

Possible Duplicate:
Python: simple list merging based on intersections

I have a multiple list:

 list=[[1,2,3],[3,5,6],[8,9,10],[11,12,13]]

Is there a smart and fast way to get all the sublists with at least one intersection. In my example I want that the code return

 result=[[1,2,3,5,6],[8,9,10],[11,12,13]]
share|improve this question

marked as duplicate by Rik Poggi, zeekay, bernie, Nick Bastin, wim Feb 19 '12 at 22:48

This question has been asked before and already has an answer. If those answers do not fully address your question, please ask a new question.

1  
+1 Interesting question! –  katrielalex Feb 19 '12 at 22:33
    
As the other question didn't have a good answer, I don't think this should be closed yet! –  katrielalex Feb 19 '12 at 22:54
    
@katrielalex: On what basis are you saying that? "A better data structure could be of help", yes I agree on that, and you're free to add your solution too. –  Rik Poggi Feb 19 '12 at 23:11
    
@Rik: looking through the comments, it seemed that all the answers were not-working in one way or another. I only read them briefly though! –  katrielalex Feb 19 '12 at 23:16
    
@katrielalex: That's because we all encountered the same bug Sven Marnach seems to have. But we also fixed that, that's why there are a lot of comments. Basically the problem is that you may have two or more lists "linked" by a non-common element from another list. –  Rik Poggi Feb 19 '12 at 23:21

3 Answers 3

up vote 0 down vote accepted

This works, but maybe isn't very elegant:

def merge_lists(l):
        s=map(set, l)
        i, n=0, len(s)
        while i < n-1:
                for j in xrange(i+1, n):
                        if s[i].intersection(s[j]):
                                s[i].update(s[j])
                                del s[j]
                                n-=1
                                break
                else:
                        i+=1
        return [sorted(i) for i in s]
share|improve this answer
    
Test your code with this data: [[65, 17, 5, 30, 79, 56, 48, 62], [6, 97, 32, 93, 55, 14, 70, 32], [75, 37, 83, 34, 9, 19, 14, 64], [43, 71], [], [89, 49, 1, 30, 28, 3, 63], [35, 21, 68, 94, 57, 94, 9, 3], [16], [29, 9, 97, 43], [17, 63, 24]] and check it against one of the solution in the duplicate question. The result should not be the same. This problem was already encountered there when the merging is not trivial. –  Rik Poggi Feb 19 '12 at 23:24
1  
Ok fixed. Not that it matters since the thread was closed anyways ... –  hochl Feb 20 '12 at 0:11

Nice question! It's much simpler if you think of it as a connected-components problem in a graph. The following code uses the excellent networkx graph library and the pairs function from this question.

def pairs(lst):
    i = iter(lst)
    first = prev = item = i.next()
    for item in i:
        yield prev, item
        prev = item
    yield item, first

lists = [[1,2,3],[3,5,6],[8,9,10],[11,12,13]]

import networkx
g = networkx.Graph()
for sub_list in lists:
    for edge in pairs(sub_list):
            g.add_edge(*edge)

networkx.connected_components(g)
[[1, 2, 3, 5, 6], [8, 9, 10], [11, 12, 13]]

Explanation

We create a new (empty) graph g. For each sub-list in lists, consider its elements as nodes of the graph and add an edge between them. (Since we only care about connectedness, we don't need to add all the edges -- only adjacent ones!) Note that add_edge takes two objects, treats them as nodes (and adds them if they aren't already there), and adds an edge between them.

Then, we just find the connected components of the graph -- a solved problem! -- and output them as our intersecting sets.

share|improve this answer
2  
I would suggest moving your answer to the other question. –  agf Feb 19 '12 at 22:58
    
I tested your answer with this data: [[65, 17, 5, 30, 79, 56, 48, 62], [6, 97, 32, 93, 55, 14, 70, 32], [75, 37, 83, 34, 9, 19, 14, 64], [43, 71], [], [89, 49, 1, 30, 28, 3, 63], [35, 21, 68, 94, 57, 94, 9, 3], [16], [29, 9, 97, 43], [17, 63, 24]] and your result seems to be missing a 16. –  Rik Poggi Feb 19 '12 at 23:06
2  
@Rik: nice point -- there was a bug in the pairs function I copied from the linked question! =p Fixed. –  katrielalex Feb 19 '12 at 23:12

You can do this with essentially a single pass through the data:

list_of_lists = [[1, 2, 3], [3, 5, 6], [8, 9, 10], [11, 12, 13]]
sets = {}
for lst in list_of_lists:
    s = set(lst)
    t = set()
    for x in s:
        if x in sets:
            t.update(sets[x])
        else:
            sets[x] = s
    for y in t:
        sets[y] = s
    s.update(t)
ids = set()
for s in sets.itervalues():
    if id(s) not in ids:
        ids.add(id(s))
        print s

This creates a dictionary sets mapping each element to the set it belongs to. If some element has been seen before, its set is subsumed into the current one and all dictinary entries mapping to the former set are updated.

Finally we need to find all unique sets in the values of the dictionary sets. Note that while I implemented this as a dictionary of sets, the code also works with lists instead of sets.

share|improve this answer
    
I'm not entirely convinced by the ids hack -- are you sure it works in all cases? (I haven't quite grokked your algorithm yet.) –  katrielalex Feb 19 '12 at 22:53
    
You can do the same thing (but slower, probably) with set(map(frozenset, sets.itervalues())). –  katrielalex Feb 19 '12 at 22:54
    
Test your code with this data: [[65, 17, 5, 30, 79, 56, 48, 62], [6, 97, 32, 93, 55, 14, 70, 32], [75, 37, 83, 34, 9, 19, 14, 64], [43, 71], [], [89, 49, 1, 30, 28, 3, 63], [35, 21, 68, 94, 57, 94, 9, 3], [16], [29, 9, 97, 43], [17, 63, 24]] and check it against one of the solution in the duplicate question. The result should not be the same. This problem was already encountered there when the merging is not trivial. –  Rik Poggi Feb 19 '12 at 22:54
    
@katrielalex: I don't see any problem with id() here, though I also thought about a different solution. Your suggestion would create a set of its own for every element, though, and compares them element-wise when inserting them into the set. Printing the result would be much slower than computing it... –  Sven Marnach Feb 19 '12 at 23:01
1  
@RikPoggi: I couldn't find any fundamental problem with my code. Your data contains a list wich contains 94 twice -- that was not covered by the answer, nor did it seem to be required by the question. (I made the trivial change to include that case.) –  Sven Marnach Feb 19 '12 at 23:56

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.