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stuck on this. Lets start with code.

Settings.php

class settings{

public $db_host;
public $db_username;
public $db_password;
public $db_database;

public function db_settings(){

    /*$db_host = "localhost";
    $db_username = "root";
    $db_password = "";
    $db_database = "eveonline";*/

    $this->db_host = "localhost";
    $this->db_username = "root";
    $this->db_password = "";
    $this->db_database = "eveonline";
}

This is where I want to use this

class xmlUpdate{

    include_once ('./lib/settings.php'); //This wont work
    public $itemCount;

    public function dbItemCount(){
    include_once ('./lib/settings.php');// This will work, but only in this function

In this case its for database varables, so I dont have to duplicate code whenever I want to make a database connection.

How can I use the database varables in another class, the whole class, not just the function where it allows me to include?

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Given me alot to work with, what stikes me is what I thought would be fairly simple, but from what I have seen so far are work arounds for what is not supported. –  Neal Trafankowski Feb 20 '12 at 9:16

4 Answers 4

up vote 0 down vote accepted

I would put the include into the __construct() function of your class, instantiate a new Class, read out the variables put them in local variables in your class.

class xmlUpdate{

    public $db_host;
    public $db_username;
    public $db_password;
    public $db_database;


    function __construct(){
        include_once('./lib/settings.php');
        $settings = new settings();

        $this->db_host = settings->db_host;
        $this->db_username= settings->db_username;
        $this->db_password= settings->db_password;
        $this->db_database= settings->db_database;

    }

}

Or you could make you xmlUpdate class extend the settings class.

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This works, any security issues I should be aware of when using this approach? –  Neal Trafankowski Feb 20 '12 at 9:51
    
Only thing I can come up with is that every class extending xmlUpdate can access the db settings. –  Crinsane Feb 20 '12 at 21:36

This might be a possible approach, the Database class could also have connect and disconnect, query etc. function. Write a __autoload function so you don't have to include any files. Another simple approach would be to define all the data in the index.php -> define('DB_HOST', 'localhost'); and later access it via DB_HOST.

class DataBase {

    private static $instance = null;
    public $db_host;
    public $db_username;
    public $db_password;
    public $db_database;

    private function __construct() {
      $this->db_host = "localhost";
      $this->db_username = "root";
      $this->db_password = "";
      $this->db_database = "eveonline";
    }

    private function __clone() {

    }

    public static function getInstance() {

        if (self::$instance === null) {
            self::$instance = new DataBase;
        }
        return self::$instance;
    }
}

class Xml {

  protected $db;

  public function __construct() {
     $this->db = DataBase::getInstance();
  }

  public function getUsername() {
    return $this->db->db_username;
  }

}


// test 

$xml = new Xml;
print $xml->getUsername() . "\n";
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I am still very new to oop and dont understand what DataBase::getInstance(); is the :: bit whats the name of that so I can look it up? –  Neal Trafankowski Feb 19 '12 at 22:36
    
The DataBase class is a so called singleton. Which means by making the __construct private, we prevent something like new DataBase from within another class. The only way to access the DataBase object is being calling the static method getInstance --> DataBase::getInstance(). –  busypeoples Feb 19 '12 at 22:40

you could make them static or follow a singleton pattern

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I think that what you're trying to do is have some GLOBAL type of thing you can access from anywhere.

As the user busypeoples suggests, you could try using the singlton pattern if you want to include some complicated behavior for the database like connections. Look up the singleton pattern and you should definitely be able to find some PHP specific examples.

If all you want to do is share some simple connection string, password and user for the database then you can use the define statement.


    //the db_info.php file
    define( 'DB_NAME', 'mydevdatabase' );
    define( 'DB_IP', '127.0.0.1' );
    define( 'DB_USER', 'bob' );
    define( 'DB_PASSWORD', 'password' );

Afterward, you can just include this file at the beginning of any PHP file and use the constants.


    //some other php file
    require_once( 'db_info.php' );
    class Test
    {
        public function tester()
        {
            $some = DB_IP;
            $other = DB_USER;
            //your other code
        }

        public function otherfunction()
        {
            $some = DB_IP;
            $other = DB_USER;
            //your code
        }

    }
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