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I'm trying to animate the font size of some text:

$("p").delay(500).animate({
    "font-size": "+=50"
}, 1000, function() {
    alert("Done");
})​;

Here's a demo.

I want to do something after animating the <p>s, which in the example is alert, but it surprisingly runs it for each <p>, and that's not what I want. Is there a possible way to make it just run once or is it not possible?

share|improve this question
    
Why ​downvote?​ – Derek 朕會功夫 Feb 19 '12 at 22:54
up vote 2 down vote accepted
var $p = $("p");
var lastIndex = $p.length - 1;

$p.delay(500).animate({
    "font-size": "+=50"
}, 1000, function() {
    if ($p.index($(this)) == lastIndex) {
        alert("Done");
    }
})

Demo

share|improve this answer
    
I like this index method that I don't have to create extra variables. Thanks! – Derek 朕會功夫 Feb 19 '12 at 23:05
    
@Derek: It does create two extra variables, by the way: lastIndex and $p... – Ryan O'Hara Feb 19 '12 at 23:10
    
@minitech, I put those 2 directly inside the function(), that's why. – Derek 朕會功夫 Feb 21 '12 at 4:33

Just to notice, you can also use a promise object:

Return a Promise object to observe when all actions of a certain type bound to the collection, queued or not, have finished.

First example (demo):

$("p").delay(500).animate({
    "font-size": "+=50"
}, 1000).promise().done(function(){
    alert("done");
});​

Second example (demo):

$.when($("p").delay(500).animate({
    "font-size": "+=50"
}, 1000)).done(function(){
    alert("done");
});​
share|improve this answer
1  
Actually, this is much nicer. +1 – Ryan O'Hara Feb 19 '12 at 23:30
    
What's the difference between those two? I can't see any... – Derek 朕會功夫 Feb 21 '12 at 4:38
    
The result is the same. These 2 methods (promise and when) return a promise object, used to attach callback like done(). – CronosS Feb 21 '12 at 6:10

You could just keep a flag, since they should animate simultaneously:

var done = false;

$("p").delay(500).animate({
    "font-size": "+=50"
}, 1000, function() {
    if(!done) {
        done = true;
        alert("Done");
    }
})​;

Here's a demo.

share|improve this answer
1  
This will work well enough in most cases, and is much cleaner, I think. – bvukelic Feb 19 '12 at 23:23

Give the P-tag in question an ID and select that ID rather than every P tag on the page. Like here: http://jsfiddle.net/LR8uP/1/

Or if you want to animate every P-tag but run the function only once, add a state variable, like here: http://jsfiddle.net/LR8uP/2/

share|improve this answer
    
No, I want to animate all <p>s but only executes once. – Derek 朕會功夫 Feb 19 '12 at 22:56

This code can be used as a generic 'countdown' type of function.

// Function that returns a function,
// which when invoked 'count' number of times,
// will invoke the function 'fn'
function runOnZero (count, fn) {
    return function () {
        if (--count <= 0) {
            fn();
        }
    };
}

// Get all the <p>s
var ps = $("p");

// Do your thing after ps.length calls
var whenAllDone = runOnZero(ps.length, function () {
   alert("Done");
});

ps.delay(500).animate({
    "font-size": "+=50"
}, 1000, whenAllDone)​;
share|improve this answer
2  
What the heck? This is very confusing... – Derek 朕會功夫 Feb 19 '12 at 23:07
    
The whenAllDone function is called once for each <p> in the list (after each <p> has been animated). When whenAllDone is called, it decrements a counter. When the counter reaches zero, the real function is called. The real function is the one that calls alert(). So although whenAllDone will be called ps.length times, it will only call alert() once, for the last <p>. – Paul Grime Feb 19 '12 at 23:17

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