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Following a friends advice, I have just replaced a 64-bit version of Ubuntu with the 32-bit version on my desktop. My desktop is a two-year-old Dell with 1 GB RAM.

Suddenly, it seems like I am using almost 50% less RAM during my usual workflow.

Why would this be the case? Is it normal, or was my 64-bit installation hosed?

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closed as off topic by cliff.meyers, Mehrdad Afshari, Shoban, sth, bdukes Jun 1 '09 at 16:14

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Pointers are twice as wide. :) –  jeffamaphone Jun 1 '09 at 15:56
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belongs on superuser.com, probably? –  Mehrdad Afshari Jun 1 '09 at 15:57
    
Yo mama's so fat, she needs a 64-bit pointer! –  crashmstr Jun 1 '09 at 16:03

2 Answers 2

up vote 6 down vote accepted

jeffamaphone is correct. Between 64 bit pointers being twice as wide and needing to load duplicate 64 & 32 bit libraries if you use so much as one 32-bit only application (such as flash) you will see outrageous memory usage.

I do not recommend 64 bit workstations until exceeding the 32 bit memory limit for this reason.

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Thank you Joshua - just the answer I was looking for. –  Matt Jun 1 '09 at 16:01
    
And thank you Jeff also! –  Matt Jun 1 '09 at 16:02
    
worth to note, that for 32-bit+PAE the memory limit is 64GB. –  vartec May 5 '11 at 11:56

Check which processes consume memory. Htop is a good program for this: http://htop.sourceforge.net/

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