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The relax-join operator is defined as:

if the natural join of the relations R and S is nonempty, then return the result of this join; otherwise, return the Cartesian product of R and S.

The problem is to write a relational algebra and SQL that return the relax-join of two relations, but not use IF-THEN-ELSE.

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Which RDBMS? Which version? –  Jack Maney Feb 20 '12 at 0:43
    
Is this even possible in SQL? The two options will have different number of columns. –  ypercube Feb 20 '12 at 1:09
    
@ypercube - it is, look at my hints. why would a natural join vs a cross join yield a different # of columns? –  J Cooper Feb 20 '12 at 1:11
    
In SQL they would. In relational algebra, for the Cartesian product to be defined, the two relations must not have a common attribute name. –  ypercube Feb 20 '12 at 1:14
1  
@JCooper: Natural join of A(x,y) with B(y,z) would yield a table with 3 columns: (x,y,z) in SQL. –  ypercube Feb 20 '12 at 1:19
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3 Answers 3

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Since this is tagged as homework I guess i am only supposed to provide guidance.

Here are some things to consider:

  1. A union will allow you to combine results of two queries A & B. It doesn't matter if A, B or both contain records or not.

  2. A cross join and a natural join will produce the same result columns. UPDATE This is not true in MYSQL as @ypercube has pointed out. You could write your sql so they do return the same columns and therefore could use both in a union. This may or may not work for you.

  3. Given your scenario, if you are ever going to return records, the cross join will always produce records. The natural join may or may not.

I hope that isn't too much of a hint, it's hard to judge if I'm revealing too much or not enough. let us know when you figure it out!

UPDATE

I wasn't aware that after x amount of time we were supposed to post the actual answer, but here is the psuedo query I was hinting at:

SELECT * 
FROM R
CROSS JOIN S
WHERE NOT EXISTS (
    SELECT *
    FROM R
    NATURAL JOIN S
)

UNION

SELECT *
FROM R
NATURAL JOIN S
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Thank you, Cooper. I got it out. Since AxB always gives a result, which may equal or not equal to the result of A join B. Simply by union (AxB - A join B) and A join B, we could solve the problem in both scenario. –  user1219940 Feb 20 '12 at 5:46
    
@user1219940 - not quite, AxB - A join B, particularly the minus - is not going to give you the results you want. In the case A join B does produce records you are going to end up with records from both queries. Basically one condition has to be met if you are going to return records from AxB... –  J Cooper Feb 20 '12 at 13:06
    
I must say that in 30 years of dealing with thousands of databases, I have never once needed to do this. Generally using a natural join is a horrible idea period (and several databases do not allow it). So don't put too much effort into learning this. –  HLGEM Feb 20 '12 at 21:36
1  
IMO - it's a neat simple assignment and the challenge lies in getting the problem solver to step away from the procedural logic security blanket –  J Cooper Feb 20 '12 at 21:49
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Because this is an operator involving relations, it can be assumed that the result must also be a relation insofar as is possible in SQL i.e. not duplicate columns, no duplicate rows, no nulls, etc. As an aside, note that if no attributes of relations R and S are common then their natural join will yield the same result as their product.

As already pointed out, if R and S have some common attributes (same name, same type) then in SQL the product of the tables will produce duplicate columns. Disregarding the idea of querying the INFORMATION_SCHEMA, the relax-join cannot be generalized in SQL. Instead, we must use explicit projections i.e. SELECT clauses with explicit attributes, at least some of which must be 'dot qualified'. Say for example we have R { x, y } and S { y, z } with y being a common column then the product can be expressed as:

SELECT DISTINCT R.x, R.y, S.z 
  FROM R CROSS JOIN S

That is, the projection of all attributes of R and the attributes of S known not to be common. There are numerous other possibilities that will yield the same result but all involve prior knowledge of the attributes involved including whether any are common.

Having accepted that the projection must be explicit, nothing is lost by expressing the natural join as its theta join equivalent i.e. [INNER] JOIN with an ON clause:

SELECT DISTINCT R.x, R.y, S.z 
  FROM R JOIN S ON R.y = S.y

Likewise, we have no need for the SQL keyword CORRESPONDING (as in UNION CORRESPONDING). Happily, this all means that my queries will all run on my SQL product of choice (SQL Server)!

One approach, I think hinted at by J Cooper, is the union of a) the natural join (which could be the empty set), and b) the product where the natural join is the empty set:

SELECT R.*, S.z 
  FROM R JOIN S ON R.y = S.y
UNION 
SELECT R.*, S.z 
  FROM R CROSS JOIN S 
 WHERE NOT EXISTS ( SELECT *
                      FROM R JOIN S ON R.y = S.y );

Another approach is the product minus the symmetric difference ('mutually exclusive tuples') where the natural join is not the empty set:

SELECT R.*, S.z 
  FROM R CROSS JOIN S 
EXCEPT
SELECT R.*, S.z 
  FROM R JOIN S ON R.y <> S.y
 WHERE EXISTS ( SELECT * 
                  FROM R JOIN S ON R.y = S.y );
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SQL:

R1 = A equi_join B
R2 = A X B

R1
U
R2 not exists R1

This is answer for this.

Since the homework due date is over:

R1 = A equi_join B
R2 = A X B

R3 = R2.* (R1 X R2)
R4 = R2 - R3

return (R1 U R4)
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I made some edits to this answer, please double check them. –  Tim Post Feb 22 '12 at 12:09
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