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The following table has the ID number of people along with cities they have worked in:

PERSON_NO | CITY_NAME
---------------------
1         |    City A
2         |    City B
3         |    City A
3         |    City B
3         |    City C
4         |    City A
4         |    City B
4         |    City C

How would I be able to get the PERSON_NO of all the people who have lived in all three cities, A,B, and C?

I want to return

PERSON_NO
---------
3
4

Thanks, again. I haven't had that much experience with SQL and so I'm not sure what to do.

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2  
Is this homework? Search for [relational division] or sql-match-all –  ypercube Feb 20 '12 at 2:34
    
@ypercube Didn't even occur to me tonight. I'll leave it deleted until we find out... –  Michael Berkowski Feb 20 '12 at 2:34
    
@Michael: I marked it for closing by mistake. I thought it was identical to the previous question of the same user. –  ypercube Feb 20 '12 at 2:38

6 Answers 6

up vote 1 down vote accepted

You can use multiple EXISTS() clauses:

   select a.PERSON_NO
   from personTable a
   where exists (select 1 from personTable where PERSON_NO = a.PERSON_NO
                 and CITY_NAME = 'City A')
   and exists (select 1 from personTable where PERSON_NO = a.PERSON_NO
                 and CITY_NAME = 'City B')
   and exists (select 1 from personTable where PERSON_NO = a.PERSON_NO
                 and CITY_NAME = 'City C')
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If you're in SQL Server 2000 or higher you can use INTERSECT:

select PERSON_NO from table1 where CITY_NAME='City A'
intersect
select PERSON_NO from table1 where CITY_NAME='City B'
intersect
select PERSON_NO from table1 where CITY_NAME='City C'
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Another way is to just join the table to itself a few times.

SELECT DISTINCT Person_No FROM mytable 
INNER JOIN mytable mt2 on (cityname='city b' and mt1.person_no=mt2.person_no)
INNER JOIN mytable mt3 on (cityname='city c' and mt1.person_no=mt3.person_no)
WHERE cityName='city a'

When first learning SQL most students don't realize it is completely legal to include the same table in a query multiple times. There are lots of problems that can be solved this way.

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1  
+1 for using joins and for the lesson involved. It is true that new SQL users often treat the table in their from clause as 'special' somehow in as far as joining it and such and forget it can be rejoined just like any other:) –  Jordan Feb 20 '12 at 2:45

I would do this with an aggregation and a HAVING. Assuming no repeats:

 SELECT person_no, count(*)
   FROM mytable
  WHERE city_name IN ('City A', 'City B', 'City C')
  GROUP BY person_no
 HAVING count(*) = 3

This has the advantage of hitting the table only once, which a join might not do.

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Didn't actually test it, but this general idea should work:

SELECT DISTINCT PERSON_ID
FROM YOUR_TABLE T1
WHERE
    NOT EXISTS (
        SELECT CITY_NAME -- All cities.
        FROM YOUR_TABLE T2
        EXCEPT -- Or may be "MINUS", depending on your DBMS.
        SELECT CITY_NAME -- Cities the user worked in.
        FROM YOUR_TABLE T3
        WHERE T1.PERSON_NO = T3.PERSON_NO
    )

In plain English:

  • For every distinct person, find the set difference between all cities and cities she worked in.
  • If that difference is empty, the person has worked in all cities.
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Strangely enough, mine seems to be the only general answer proposed so far. All the other answers will require modification of the SQL text if a city is added/modified/deleted in the table. –  Branko Dimitrijevic Feb 20 '12 at 3:08

Try this

SELECT   PERSON_NO 
FROM     YOURTABLENAME
WHERE    CITY_NAME =  'City A'
         AND  CITY_NAME = 'City B'
         AND  CITY_NAME = 'City C'
share|improve this answer
    
-1 No single CITY_NAME can be equal to more than one value at the same time, so this will never return any rows. –  Branko Dimitrijevic Feb 20 '12 at 3:11
    
Ah ok I'm quite new to this too.. thought this was possible... thanks for clarrification –  MonteCristo Feb 20 '12 at 21:06

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