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I am trying to reference a slice of a "global" numpy array via a object attribute. Here is what I think the class structure would be like and it's use case.

import numpy

class X:

    def __init__(self, parent):
        self.parent = parent
        self.pid = [0, 1, 2]

    def __getattr__(self, name):
        if name == 'values':
            return self.parent.P[self.pid]
        else:
            raise AttributeError


class Node:

    def __init__(self):
        self.P = numpy.array([1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10])
        self._values = X(self)

    def __getattr__(self, name):
        if name == 'x':
            return self._values.values
        else:
            raise AttributeError

Here is the use case:

>>> n = Node()
>>> print n.P
[ 1  2  3  4  5  6  7  8  9 10]
>>> print n.x
[1 2 3]
>>> print n.x[1:3]
[2 3]

Which works fine, now I would like to assign values to n.P through the n.x attribute by,

>>> n.x = numpy.array([11, 12, 13])

to get,

>>> print n.P
[ 11  12  13  4  5  6  7  8  9 10]

Or assign values to slices by,

>>> n.x[1:3] = numpy.array([77, 88])

to get,

>>> print n.P
[ 11  77  88  4  5  6  7  8  9 10]

But for the life of me, I'm struggling to get this assignment working. I thought it would be easy using __setattr__ and __setitem__, but a whole day later I still haven't managed it.

Ultimately, n.x will be returned as a multi-dimensional array where the X class will reshape is on return, but is stored in a n.P which is a vector. I have removed this to simplify the problem.

I would love some help on this. Has anyone done this before? Or suggest how to do this?

Thanks in advance for your help.

SOLUTION

So after many days of stumbling around I found a solution. I suspect this can be simplified and refined. The solution is to create a X object in your Node object. When it's retrieved, it returns temporary numpy object (Values) with knowledge of it's parent node and pids. The setslice_ function is defined in this update the global P array with the new values. If the X object is is assigned, it doesn't return a Values object but sets the global P values directly.

Two points, which may be invalid: 1. The Node and X objects had to be a sub-class of object; 2. if setting a higher dimension array, you need to use __setitem__ instead, which won't work on 1D arrays or lists.

As I said I suspect this code can be improves since I'm not sure I fully understand it. I am happy to take improvements and suggestions.

Thanks for your help, especially Bago.

Here is my final code.

import numpy

class Values(numpy.ndarray):

    def __new__(cls, input_array, node, pids):
        obj = numpy.asarray(input_array).view(cls)
        obj.node = node
        obj.pids = pids
        return obj

    def __setslice__(self, i, j, values):
        self.node._set_values(self.pids[i:j], values)


class X(object):

    def __get__(self, instance, owner):
        p = instance.P[instance.pids]
        return Values(p, instance, instance.pids)

    def __set__(self, instance, values):
        instance.P[instance.pids] = values

class Node(object):

    x = X()

    def __init__(self, pids=[0, 1, 2]):
        self.P = numpy.arange(11)
        self.pids = pids

    def _set_values(self, pids, values):
        self.P[pids] = values


node = Node(pids=[4, 5, 6, 7])
print '\nInitial State:'
print 'P =', node.P
print 'x =', node.x
print 'x[1:3] =', node.x[1:3]

print '\nSetting node.x = [44, 55, 66, 77]:'
node.x = [44, 55, 66, 77]
print 'P =', node.P
print 'x =', node.x
print 'x[1:3] =', node.x[1:3]

print '\nSetting node.x[1:3] = [100, 200]:'
node.x[1:3] = [100, 200]
print 'P =', node.P
print 'x =', node.x
print 'x[1:3] =', node.x[1:3]
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1 Answer 1

It's not clear to me what's not working, but I think maybe you're trying to do something like this:

import numpy

class X(object):

    def __init__(self, parent):
        self.parent = parent
        self.pid = [0, 1, 2]

    @property
    def values(self):
        tmp = self.parent.P[self.pid]
        return tmp
    @values.setter
    def values(self, input):
        self.parent.P[self.pid] = input

class Node(object):

    def __init__(self):
        self.P = numpy.array([1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10])
        self._values = X(self)

    @property
    def x(self):
        return self._values.values
    @x.setter
    def x(self, input):
        self._values.values = input

I hope that get's you started.

update

The reason that n.x[1:3] = [77, 88] doesn't work using this approach is because n.x and n.x[:] = ~ both call the get method of X.values which returns tmp. But tmp is a copy of part of P and after n.x[:] = ~ tmp is thrown away and P is not updated. tmp is a copy because when you index an array with another array you get a copy not a view. Here is an example to make that more clear, you can read more about numpy slicing/indexing here.

>>> P = np.arange(10)
>>> pid = np.array([1, 2, 3])
>>> Q = P[pid]
>>> Q[:] = 99
>>> P
array([0, 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9])
>>> R = P[1:4]
>>> R[:] = 99
>>> P
array([ 0, 99, 99, 99,  4,  5,  6,  7,  8,  9])
>>> P[[1,2]][:] = 88
>>> P
array([ 0, 99, 99, 99,  4,  5,  6,  7,  8,  9])

setitem won't help, because you're calling the setitem method of the tmp not X.

The easiest way to make it work is to replace the pid array with a slice, but I know that's kind of limiting. You could also keep track of the tmp array, have a self._tmp so you can move the values from _tmp to P later. I know neither of those are perfect, but maybe someone else here will come up with a better approach. Sorry I couldn't do more.

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Thanks for your help. It mostly works but I cannot do n.x[1:3] = numpy.array([77, 88]) and get n.P = numpy.array([1, 77, 88, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10]). I've looked everywhere for @values.setitem decorator but no luck. –  duane Feb 20 '12 at 23:44
    
Thanks Bago. That's what I thought. I started searching for ways to pass pointers for a slice instead of the copy. My first implementation was to store values in X which I later added to P by manually running a function but I'm wanting to do away with it. I might have to update slices using a function for the meantime, i.e., n.set_values(slice, values). I'm thinking about a additional dummy object that detects setitem vs setattr, then values to X as function calls. Not sure if it'll work, I can't quite get my head around it. Thanks anyway. –  duane Feb 22 '12 at 0:31
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