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Creating a wrapper function for a constructor such as the following compiles just fine:

#include <iostream>

template <typename T>
class wrapper
{
public:
  template <typename A0>
  T* operator () (const A0& a0) const
  {
    return new T(a0);
  }
};

class Foo
{
public:
  Foo(int i) { std::cout << "Foo:Foo(" << i << ")" << std::endl; }
};

int main(int argc, char** argv)
{
  wrapper<Foo>()(42);
  return 0;
}

But the code does not compile when I update the line:

T* operator () (const A0& a0) const

to:

T* operator () (A0& a0) const

My guess is this has to do with the rvalue '42' not being bindable to to a non-const reference. But when I make the reference const this will mean that I could never call a constructor that actually takes a non-const reference. Can someone explain what is going on here, and what is the right thing to do to make it work?

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Declaring a parameter const is a promise to the callers that the function will not change the parameter. It increases the types you can pass into it. –  David Nehme Feb 20 '12 at 5:14

1 Answer 1

My guess is this has to do with the rvalue '42' not being bindable to to a non-const reference.

Yes. Correct.

But when I make the reference const this will mean that I could never call a constructor that actually takes a non-const reference.

No. Incorrect. You can still call it with non-const reference. In fact, that is how const-ness works : non-const reference/pointer/object can implicitly convert into const reference/pointer/object, but vice-versa is not true.

So try it out.

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I did try it out, before I posted this question. When I change the Foo constructor to be Foo(int& i) { ... and make the wrapper function call operator take a const reference instead of just a reference it will not compile because the constructor does not take a const reference. Unless I'm missing something? –  user1220090 Feb 20 '12 at 5:24
    
@user1220090: You should use Foo(int const &i). But since it is built-in type, a more sane choice is this : Foo(int i). That is, just pass by value. –  Nawaz Feb 20 '12 at 5:29
    
Okay, using int was a bad choice. Let me see if I can clarify my question, what if the constructor was Foo(Bar &b) where Bar was some other type that I wanted to pass to the constructor by non-const reference? How can I achieve this? –  user1220090 Feb 20 '12 at 5:36
    
@user1220090: then as I said, it should be Foo(Bar const &b). –  Nawaz Feb 20 '12 at 5:38
    
but I want to pass b as a non-const reference. If I do as you suggest then I can't modify any of the fields in b or call any non-const methods of b. –  user1220090 Feb 20 '12 at 5:41

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