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I am writing simple, unsophisticated web-server code in java. It seems to be finished, but I'm not quite sure how to test it. Could someone point me in the right direction? All the coding is finished, I just need to test the code. I tried running it from the terminal, and then connecting to localhost with a specified port, but I only get 404 NOT FOUNDs. I reiterate, I don't think this is a problem with the code, but with my guessing at methods by which to test drive said code. Ideas?

import java.io.*;
import java.net.*;
import java.util.*;

final class HttpRequest implements Runnable {
    final static String CRLF = "\r\n";
    Socket socket;

    // Constructor
    public HttpRequest(Socket socket) throws Exception {
        this.socket = socket;
    }

    // Implement the run() method of the Runnable interface.
    public void run() {
        try {
            processRequest();
        } catch (Exception e) {
            System.out.println(e);
        }
    }

    private static void sendBytes(FileInputStream fis, OutputStream os) 
    throws Exception {
    // Construct a 1K buffer to hold bytes on their way to the socket.
    byte[] buffer = new byte[1024];
    int bytes = 0;

    // Copy requested file into the socket's output stream.
    while((bytes = fis.read(buffer)) != -1 ) {
        os.write(buffer, 0, bytes);
        }
    }

    private static String contentType(String fileName) {
    if(fileName.endsWith(".htm") || fileName.endsWith(".html")) {
        return "text/html";
    }
    if(fileName.endsWith(".jpeg") || fileName.endsWith(".jpg")) {
    return "image/jpeg";
    }
    if(fileName.endsWith(".gif")) {
    return "image/gif";
    }
    return "application/octet-stream";
    }

    private void processRequest() throws Exception {
        // Get a reference to the socket's input and output streams.
        InputStream is = socket.getInputStream();
        DataOutputStream os = new DataOutputStream(socket.getOutputStream());

        // Set up input stream filters.
        BufferedReader br = new BufferedReader(new InputStreamReader(is));

        // Get the request line of the HTTP request message.
        String requestLine = new String(br.readLine());

        // Display the request line.
        System.out.println();
        System.out.println(requestLine);

        // Get and display the header lines.
        String headerLine = null;
        while ((headerLine = br.readLine()).length() != 0) {
            System.out.println(headerLine);
        }

    // Extract the filename from the request line.
    StringTokenizer tokens = new StringTokenizer(requestLine);
    tokens.nextToken(); // skip over the method, which should be "GET"
    String fileName = tokens.nextToken();
    // Prepend a "." so that file request is within the current directory.
    fileName = "." + fileName;

    // Open the requested file.
    FileInputStream fis = null;
    boolean fileExists = true;
    try {
    fis = new FileInputStream(fileName);
    } catch (FileNotFoundException e) {
    fileExists = false;
    }

    // Construct the response message.
    String statusLine = null;
    String contentTypeLine = null;
    String entityBody = null;
    if (fileExists) {
    statusLine = "200 OK" + CRLF;
    contentTypeLine = "Content-type: " + 
        contentType( fileName ) + CRLF;
    } else {
    statusLine = "404 NOT FOUND" + CRLF;
    contentTypeLine = "Content Not Found!" + CRLF;
    entityBody = "<HTML>" + 
        "<HEAD><TITLE>Not Found</TITLE></HEAD>" +
        "<BODY>Not Found</BODY></HTML>";
    }

    // Send the status line.
    os.writeBytes(statusLine);

    // Send the content type line.
    os.writeBytes(contentTypeLine);

    // Send a blank line to indicate the end of the header lines.
    os.writeBytes(CRLF);

    // Send the entity body.
    if (fileExists) {
    sendBytes(fis, os);
    fis.close();
    } else {
    os.writeBytes("File DNE: Content Not Found!");
    }

        // Close streams and socket.
        os.close();
        br.close();
        socket.close();
    }
    public static void main(String[] args) throws Exception {
        final ServerSocket ss = new ServerSocket(8080);
        while (true)
            new HttpRequest(ss.accept()).run();
    }
}

Solution:

SOLVED. It turns out, to test it, all you need to do is:

1) run the program from the terminal as per usual,

2) place the file you want to try to retrieve (lets say "example.html") into the same folder as your .java file(s),

3) in a separate terminal, run the command $ wget localhost:PORT/FILE.EXTENSION

(I used port 8080 here, so $ wget localhost:8080/example.html)

You should now see, in the folder you are currently sending the wget command from, an html response file "200 OK" or "404 File Not Server", along with the contents of the file if the former is true.

I was over-complicating this, as were the comments/replies... But it's done. Guessing and checking ftw.

share|improve this question
    
Any particular reason you're attempting to write your own HTTP server, when many other suitable, mature, stable, and well-tested solutions already exist? Consider something like and.org/texts/server-http - are you prepared to handle all this? For Java, consider something like Jetty - a web server that is embeddable into the JVM, and can be configured to do exactly what you're looking to do. –  ziesemer Feb 20 '12 at 3:34
    
It's just a little project I'm working on for class. It's not supposed to be anything sophisticated. Just functional. –  user1034868 Feb 20 '12 at 3:36
1  
I have hard time imagining a situation where somebody can write a program but can't figure out how to test it. –  MK. Feb 20 '12 at 3:40
1  
To test as in 'drive' this code, all you need is curl or wget. You could also write a more comprehensive suite using, say, Apache HttpComponents. On the other hand, to debug the code and figure out why it is or isn't working, as Jim suggested you'll want to set breakpoints and step through it and/or use logging to capture and inspect program flow. –  AlistairIsrael Feb 20 '12 at 3:50
1  
@user1034868: Please post your solution as an answer below instead of adding it to the question. –  casablanca Feb 20 '12 at 4:43
show 7 more comments

1 Answer

up vote 2 down vote accepted

SOLVED. It turns out, to test it, all you need to do is:

1) run the program from the terminal as per usual,

2) place the file you want to try to retrieve (lets say "example.html") into the same folder as your .java file(s),

3) in a separate terminal, run the command $ wget localhost:PORT/FILE.EXTENSION

(I used port 8080 here, so $ wget localhost:8080/example.html)

You should now see, in the folder you are currently sending the wget command from, a response file "200 OK" or "404 File Not Server", along with the contents of the file if the former is true.

I was over-complicating this, as were the comments/replies... But it's done. Guessing and checking ftw.

share|improve this answer
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