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Making a ternary logic table, and I would like to make my own function for an operator that i'll call "<=>". so for example, I want to do this, but that isn't right. what's the correct way to do this? or any links I can read? couldn't really find anything in a google search

data Ternary = T | F | M
deriving (Eq,  Show, Ord)

<=>::Ternary->Ternary->Ternary
<=> T F = F
<=> T T = T
<=> T M = M
<=> F F = T
<=> F T = F
<=> F M = M
<=> M F = M
<=> M T = M
<=> M M = T
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Just as a side note, M <=> M should be M rather than T. But that depends on your "Maybe" semantics. –  bitmask Feb 20 '12 at 6:06
    
Don't forget that you can set arity and associativity by using infixl, infixr... –  Landei Feb 20 '12 at 8:31
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4 Answers

up vote 19 down vote accepted

Just add parentheses around your operator:

(<=>) :: Ternary -> Ternary -> Ternary
(<=>) T F = F
(<=>) T T = T
(<=>) T M = M
(<=>) F F = T
(<=>) F T = F
(<=>) F M = M
(<=>) M F = M
(<=>) M T = M
(<=>) M M = T

This turns it from infix form to prefix form. Alternatively, you can just use infix in the definition:

(<=>) :: Ternary -> Ternary -> Ternary
T <=> F = F
T <=> T = T
T <=> M = M
F <=> F = T
F <=> T = F
F <=> M = M
M <=> F = M
M <=> T = M
M <=> M = T
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oh snap, thank you!! –  user1189352 Feb 20 '12 at 5:11
    
Haskell is so foreign to me and the syntax is driving me nuts, thanks again –  user1189352 Feb 20 '12 at 5:11
4  
No problem! Don't forget to make this as "accepted" by clicking the checkmark underneath the votes counter. –  Clark Gaebel Feb 20 '12 at 5:30
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Function names with symbols have different syntax than those without:

-- Works:
(<^>) :: Int -> Int -> Int
a <^> b = a + b

-- Doesn't work:
{-
<^> :: Int -> Int -> Int
<^> a b = a + b
-}

-- Works:
letters :: Int -> Int -> Int
letters a b = a + b

-- Doesn't work:
{-
(letters) :: Int -> Int -> Int
a letters b = a + b
-}

I promise, though - Haskell is well worth learning the complex rules.

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thank you that was helpful! –  user1189352 Feb 20 '12 at 6:37
2  
For completeness: a `letters` b works … –  Konrad Rudolph Feb 20 '12 at 11:11
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You can simplify (line-wise) the definition as follows:

(<=>) :: Ternary -> Ternary -> Ternary
T <=> T = T
F <=> F = T
M <=> M = T
M <=> _ = M
_ <=> M = M
_ <=> _ = F
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That doesn't look simpler to me. –  Clark Gaebel Feb 22 '12 at 5:05
    
That's why I have a (line-wise) in there. Clarity is debatable though. I can see the code better because I am forced to deduce what it actually does as opposed to looking at a raw tabulated definition. But that's me. –  Thomas Eding Feb 22 '12 at 8:18
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Since you have Eq and Ord, you can do the following:

data Ternary = T | F | M
deriving (Eq, Show, Ord)

(<=>) :: Ternary -> Ternary -> Ternary
x <=> y = if x == y then T else max x y

If you do happen to change it so that M <=> M == M, then you can do the following:

data Ternary = M | T | F
deriving (Eq, Show, Ord, Enum)

(<=>) :: Ternary -> Ternary -> Ternary
x <=> y = fromEnum $ rem (toEnum x * toEnum y) 3
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