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I'm using net/http to pull in some json data from the Yahoo Placemaker API. After receiving the response I am performing JSON.parse on the response. This gives me a hash that looks like:

{"processingTime"=>"0.001493", "version"=>"1.4.0.526 build 111113", "documentLength"=>"25", "document"=>{"administrativeScope"=>{"woeId"=>"2503863", "type"=>"Town", "name"=>"Tampa, FL, US", "centroid"=>{"latitude"=>"27.9465", "longitude"=>"-82.4593"}}, "geographicScope"=>{"woeId"=>"2503863", "type"=>"Town", "name"=>"Tampa, FL, US", "centroid"=>{"latitude"=>"27.9465", "longitude"=>"-82.4593"}}, "localScopes"=>{"localScope"=>{"woeId"=>"2503863", "type"=>"Town", "name"=>"Tampa, FL, US (Town)", "centroid"=>{"latitude"=>"27.9465", "longitude"=>"-82.4593"}, "southWest"=>{"latitude"=>"27.8132", "longitude"=>"-82.6489"}, "northEast"=>{"latitude"=>"28.1714", "longitude"=>"-82.2539"}, "ancestors"=>[{"ancestor"=>{"woeId"=>"12587831", "type"=>"County", "name"=>"Hillsborough"}}, {"ancestor"=>{"woeId"=>"2347568", "type"=>"State", "name"=>"Florida"}}, {"ancestor"=>{"woeId"=>"23424977", "type"=>"Country", "name"=>"United States"}}]}}, "extents"=>{"center"=>{"latitude"=>"27.9465", "longitude"=>"-82.4593"}, "southWest"=>{"latitude"=>"27.8132", "longitude"=>"-82.6489"}, "northEast"=>{"latitude"=>"28.1714", "longitude"=>"-82.2539"}}, "placeDetails"=>{"placeId"=>"1", "place"=>{"woeId"=>"2503863", "type"=>"Town", "name"=>"Tampa, FL, US", "centroid"=>{"latitude"=>"27.9465", "longitude"=>"-82.4593"}}, "placeReferenceIds"=>"1", "matchType"=>"0", "weight"=>"1", "confidence"=>"8"}, "referenceList"=>{"reference"=>{"woeIds"=>"2503863", "placeReferenceId"=>"1", "placeIds"=>"1", "start"=>"15", "end"=>"20", "isPlaintextMarker"=>"1", "text"=>"Tampa", "type"=>"plaintext", "xpath"=>""}}}}

I am able to access elements by doing things like jsonResponse['version'] but I am not able to do jsonResponse.version. Why is this?

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I don't think Ruby supports that. –  Rishav Rastogi Feb 20 '12 at 5:58

4 Answers 4

up vote 18 down vote accepted

Hash does not have dot-syntax for it's keys. OpenStruct does:

require 'ostruct'
hash = {:name => 'John'}
os = OpenStruct.new(hash)
p os.name #=> "John"
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That is a JavaScript feature, not a Ruby feature. In Ruby, to use a "dot syntax", the object would need to respond to those methods. Ruby hashes use the #[](key) method to access elements.

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Why not, you can do this via metaprogramming

module LookLikeJSON
  def method_missing(meth, *args, &block)
    if has_key?(meth.to_s)
      self[meth.to_s]
    else
      raise NoMethodError, 'undefined method #{meth} for #{self}' 
    end
  end
end

h = {"processingTime"=>"0.001493", "version"=>"1.4.0.526 build 111113", "documentLength"=>"25"}
h.extend(LookLikeJSON)
h.processingTime #=> "0.001493"
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1  
Right, but why bother? –  d11wtq Feb 20 '12 at 7:15
    
+1: that's exactly what I would do! :) –  Sony Santos Feb 20 '12 at 7:26
    
interpolate string in single quote? : / And using stringify_keys! to normalize the keys first. –  Yuanfei Zhu Mar 6 '12 at 4:49

Because Hash doesn't have a version method.

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