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I am trying to make a class that wraps std::map and does checking to make sure the keys are one the of approved valid strings, and also initializes the map to have default values for all the approved valid strings. I am having issues getting the subscript operator to work, specifically the const version of it.

Here is my class prototyping code:

#include <set>
#include <string>
#include <map>

class foo {
  public:
    foo() {}
    const double & operator[](const std::string key) const {
      return data[key];
    }
  private:
    static const std::set<std::string> validkeys;
    std::map<std::string, double> data;
};

const std::set<std::string> foo::validkeys = {"foo1", "foo2"};

When I compile this (using g++ with -std=c++0x), I get this compilation error:

|| /home/luke/tmp/testmap.cc: In member function 'double& foo::operator[](std::string) const':
testmap.cc|10 col 22 error| passing 'const std::map<std::basic_string<char>, double>' as
'this' argument of 'mapped_type& std::map<_Key, _Tp, _Compare, _Alloc>::operator[](const
key_type&) [with _Key = std::basic_string<char>, _Tp = double, _Compare =
std::less<std::basic_string<char> >, _Alloc = std::allocator<std::pair<const 
std::basic_string<char>, double> >, mapped_type = double, key_type = 
std::basic_string<char>]' discards qualifiers

Nothing I do seems to fix this. I have tried

  • making validkeys a std::set and data std::map
  • using const char * instead of string
  • returning const double or double instead of const double &
  • using list and vector instead of set to store the validkeys

I don't know if I'm even approaching this problem correctly so if there is some other simple way to create a class that allows this kind of functionality:

foo a;
a["foo2"] = a["foo1"] = 5.0;
// This would raise a std::runtime_error because I would be checking that
// "foo3" isn't in validkeys
a["foo3"] = 4.0;

Any suggestions greatly appreciated.

SOLUTION

The following works exactly how I want it to, I even have a basic exception when you try to set or get a key that isn't in the set of valid keys:

#include <iostream>
#include <string>
#include <map>
#include <set>
#include <stdexcept>

class myfooexception : public std::runtime_error
{
  public:
    myfooexception(const std::string & s)
      : std::runtime_error(s + " is not a valid key.") {}
};

class foo {
  public:
    foo() {
     for (std::set<std::string>::iterator it = validkeys.begin();
          it != validkeys.end();
          ++it) {
       data[*it] = 0.0;
     }
    }
    const double & operator[](const std::string & key) const {
      if (data.find(key) == data.end()) {
        throw myfooexception(key);
      } else {
        return data.find(key)->second;
      }
    }
    double & operator[](const std::string & key) {
      if (data.find(key) == data.end()) {
        throw myfooexception(key);
      } else {
        return data[key];
      }
    }
  private:
    static const std::set<std::string> validkeys;
    std::map<std::string, double> data;
};

const std::set<std::string> foo::validkeys = {"foo1", "foo2"};

int main(void)
{
  foo a;
  a["foo1"] = 2.0;
  a["foo1"] = a["foo2"] = 1.5;
  // a["foo3"] = 2.3; // raises exception:  foo3 is is not a valid key
  const foo b;
  std::cout << b["foo1"]; // should be ok
  // b["foo1"] = 5.0;  // compliation error, as expected: b is const.

  return 0;
}
share|improve this question
    
why would you want to do 2 scans of the map? You could use find and check its result –  davka Feb 20 '12 at 8:06
    
Thanks. I changed it to if (data.find(key) == data.end()) –  hazelnusse Feb 20 '12 at 8:42
1  
you're still doing it twice :) –  davka Feb 20 '12 at 11:16
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4 Answers 4

The subscript operator for std::map is non-const as it inserts a new element if one does not yet exist. If you want your map to have a const operator[], you need to write one that uses map::find() and tests against map::end(), handling the error case.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks, this works. I used map::count(key) to check to see if the key existed. See my solution above. –  hazelnusse Feb 20 '12 at 7:49
    
You are searching twice if you use map::count(). –  Simon Richter Feb 20 '12 at 8:20
    
Thanks. I changed it to if (data.find(key) == data.end()) –  hazelnusse Feb 20 '12 at 8:40
1  
You are still searching twice -- each call to find does a lookup. You want to keep the iterator between invocations. BTW, count() on a map is just (find(key) != end())? 1 : 0, as keys are guaranteed to be unique. –  Simon Richter Feb 20 '12 at 9:58
add comment

The operator [] is not declared const in the std::map, because the operator [] also inserts a new element when the key is not found and returns a reference to its mapped value. You can use the map::find method instead of map::operator[] if you want your operator[] to be const.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for the response, map::find works. –  hazelnusse Feb 20 '12 at 8:49
add comment

you are trying to modify a const object!! please remove the const of set.const members cannot be modified once they are initialised.

share|improve this answer
    
If you are referring to the static const std::set<std::string> validkeys;, this is valid C++ -- this is how you initialize static const member variables. –  hazelnusse Feb 20 '12 at 7:52
add comment

You are trying to assign to the std::map but your function is declared const and also returning const. Remove both const and it should work.

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