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I have a very simple two column setup shows below.

However in example one where I have the two column setup the #left and #right divs will float above the #posts container.

Example 2 does not float like this but is not the two column setup I am looking for. Suggestions?

div#posts 
{
   width: 700px;  
   margin: 0 auto;  
   margin-top: 5px;
   margin-bottom: 0px;  
   padding: 5px;  
   border: 1px solid #CCC;  
   background-color: #EEE;  
} 

div#left {
   float:left;
   width:100px;
   background:#EEE;
}

div#right {
   float:right;
   width:500px;
   background:#EEE;
}


<!-- example 1 

<div id="posts">
    <div id="left">post</div>
    <div id="right">post</div>
</div>

<!-- example 2

<div id="posts">
    <div>post</div>
    <div>post</div>
</div>
share|improve this question
up vote 0 down vote accepted

[edit: OK, forget that]

The right way to approach this is to add a div inside the Posts div but after the columns with the attribute clear: both;

Ex:

<div id="posts">
    <div id="left">post</div>
    <div id="right">post</div>
    <div style="clear: both;"></div>
</div>

Most people keep a .clear class (.clear { clear: both; } ) on hand for this purpose. It comes up quite frequently.

share|improve this answer
    
nope. looks the same... – ian Jun 1 '09 at 17:16
    
Yea that makes it work but floats the whole div to the side and its a centered layout.. hmmm. – ian Jun 1 '09 at 17:24
    
Yay. Thanks works perfect. – ian Jun 1 '09 at 17:32
1  
Using explicit clearing divs like this is generally not needed any more; setting overflow: auto; on the containing element has the same effect and requires no additional markup (see my answer). – Ben Blank Jun 1 '09 at 17:32
    
Agreeing with Ben. Apologies epalla, but while empty clear:both divs work, it's adding extraneous markup. – Steve Perks Jun 1 '09 at 18:31

Just add overflow: auto; to your div#posts rule.

Setting the overflow property to auto has the side-effect of causing that element to contain floats in all modern browsers. The only time (that I'm aware of) that this can cause issues is if there is some constraint (limited space available, explicit width/height with oversized contents, etc.) which makes automatic scrollbars undesirable, but that isn't common. (In fact, automatic scrollbars are usually a good thing in those cases.)

share|improve this answer
    
I will try this approach also thanks! – ian Jun 1 '09 at 17:38

Overflow:auto would be an elegant solution, if it were cross-browser compatible. It will cause you some problems on IE6/7 if I remember correctly.

Some more info on overflow auto/hidden http://www.wickham43.supanet.com/tutorial/scrollingdivs.html

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