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I'm trying to calculate the fourier transform of a gaussian beam. Later I want to ad some modifications to the following example code. With the required stepsize of 1e-6 the calculation with 8 kernel takes 1244s on my workstation. The most consuming part is obviously the generation of uaperture. Has anyone ideas to improve the performance? Why does mathematica not create a packed list from my expression, when I'm having both real and complex values in it?

uin[gx_, gy_, z_] :=  Module[{w0 = L1[[1]], z0 = L1[[3]], w, R, \[Zeta], k},
w = w0 Sqrt[1 + (z/z0)^2];
R = z (1 + (z0/z)^2);
\[Zeta] = ArcTan[z/z0];
k = 2*Pi/193*^-9;
Developer`ToPackedArray[
  ParallelTable[
  w0/w Exp[-(x^2 + y^2)/w^2] Exp[-I k/2/R (x^2 + y^2)/2] Exp[-I k z*0 + 
  I \[Zeta]*0], {x, gx}, {y, gy}]
  ]  
]

AbsoluteTiming[ 
dx = 1*^-6;  
gx = Range[-8*^-3, 8*^-3, dx];
gy = gx;
d = 15*^-3;
uaperture = uin[gx, gy, d];
ufft = dx*dx* Fourier[uaperture];
uout = RotateRight[
Abs[ufft]*dx^2, {Floor[Length[gx]/2], Floor[Length[gx]/2]}];
]

Thanks in advance,

Johannes

share|improve this question
    
Use ToPackedArray[ 0. I + array ] to force everything to be Complex before packing. Then it will succeed in creating a packed array. –  Szabolcs Feb 20 '12 at 13:10
    
Thanks for the tip, but ToPackedArray[ ParallelTable[Exp[-(x^2 + y^2)/w^2]Exp[-I k/2/R (x^2 + y^2)/2], {x, gx}, {y, gy}]]] is a packed array. Unfortunately ParallelTable first evaluates as unpacked array and that consumes plenty of memory and time. If I try ParallelTable[Exp[-(x^2 + y^2)/w^2], {x, gx}, {y, gy}]]] without the complex part the result is a packed array. –  mr_endres Feb 20 '12 at 16:16
    
I didn't take a good look at the code, but I suspect that Method -> "CoarsestGrained" in ParallelTable may reduce memory usage that is due to unpacking. But then it may not ... just and idea to try. –  Szabolcs Feb 20 '12 at 16:22
    
Thanks, seems to improve the speed and memory overhead at least at my pc at home with 2 kernels, but I'm sure it will also speed up the workstation. But it's astonishing that compared with the same code implemented in Matlab, Mathematica takes more than 20 longer to compute the same result. –  mr_endres Feb 20 '12 at 18:37
    
For future questions you can also try mathematica.stackexchange.com It has a more active Mathematica community, almost no question goes unanswered. –  Szabolcs Feb 20 '12 at 23:40

1 Answer 1

You can speed it up by first vectorizing it (uin2), then compiling it (uin3):

In[1]:= L1 = {0.1, 0.2, 0.3};

In[2]:= uin[gx_, gy_, z_] :=
 Module[{w0 = L1[[1]], z0 = L1[[3]], w, R, \[Zeta], k},
  w = w0 Sqrt[1 + (z/z0)^2];
  R = z (1 + (z0/z)^2);
  \[Zeta] = ArcTan[z/z0];
  k = 2*Pi/193*^-9;
  ParallelTable[
   w0/w Exp[-(x^2 + y^2)/
      w^2] Exp[-I k/2/R (x^2 + y^2)/2] Exp[-I k z*0 + 
      I \[Zeta]*0], {x, gx}, {y, gy}]
  ]

In[3]:= uin2[gx_, gy_, z_] :=
 Module[{w0 = L1[[1]], z0 = L1[[3]], w, R, \[Zeta], k, x, y},
  w = w0 Sqrt[1 + (z/z0)^2];
  R = z (1 + (z0/z)^2);
  \[Zeta] = ArcTan[z/z0];
  k = 2*Pi/193*^-9;
  {x, y} = Transpose[Outer[List, gx, gy], {3, 2, 1}];
  w0/w Exp[-(x^2 + y^2)/
     w^2] Exp[-I k/2/R (x^2 + y^2)/2] Exp[-I k z*0 + I \[Zeta]*0]
  ]

In[4]:= uin3 =
  Compile[{{gx, _Real, 1}, {gy, _Real, 1}, z},
   Module[{w0 = L1[[1]], z0 = L1[[3]], w, R, \[Zeta], k, x, y},
    w = w0 Sqrt[1 + (z/z0)^2];
    R = z (1 + (z0/z)^2);
    \[Zeta] = ArcTan[z/z0];
    k = 2*Pi/193*^-9;
    {x, y} = Transpose[Outer[List, gx, gy], {3, 2, 1}];
    w0/w Exp[-(x^2 + y^2)/
       w^2] Exp[-I k/2/R (x^2 + y^2)/2] Exp[-I k z*0 + I \[Zeta]*0]
    ],
   CompilationOptions -> {"InlineExternalDefinitions" -> True}
   ];

In[5]:= dx = 1*^-5;
gx = Range[-8*^-3, 8*^-3, dx];
gy = gx;
d = 15*^-3;

In[9]:= r1 = uin[gx, gy, d]; // AbsoluteTiming

Out[9]= {67.9448862, Null}

In[10]:= r2 = uin2[gx, gy, d]; // AbsoluteTiming

Out[10]= {28.3326206, Null}

In[11]:= r3 = uin3[gx, gy, d]; // AbsoluteTiming

Out[11]= {0.4190239, Null}

We got a ~160x speedup even though this is not running in parallel.

Results are the same:

In[12]:= r1 == r2
Out[12]= True

There's a tiny difference here due to numerical errors:

In[13]:= r2 == r3
Out[13]= False

In[14]:= Max@Abs[r2 - r3]
Out[14]= 5.63627*10^-14
share|improve this answer
    
Wow remarkable speedup! I know vectorizing code from using Matlab, but never used it that way in Mathematica. I'm also surprised from compiling the code. Many thanks for the example code and also for the mathematica.stackexchange.com link. –  mr_endres Feb 21 '12 at 6:19

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