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Look at this code please:

char o,t; cin >> o >> t;
switch (o,t)
{
  case 's','g': cout << "Finish"; break;
  default: cout << "Nothing";
}

as you can see switch is set for two values, but in case command I can not check for both of them at the same time. What should I do? is there any way?

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1  
It seems you want to exit when "sg" is entered. If so, just input a string (char array), compare it with "sg" and exit. –  Ajay Feb 20 '12 at 10:07

5 Answers 5

up vote 3 down vote accepted

You cannot do switch for two expressions at the same time. The switch part only compiles because there is a comma operator (which simply evaluates to the second value, in this case t).

Use plain old if statements.

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Thanks for your reply, Let me ask another question. How can I copy those two char into a string value? for example string r; r=o+t; r should be "sg" but it will become another thing, do you know how to do it? –  Stranger Feb 20 '12 at 9:55
1  
that invokes the addition operator for chars, it's like adding integers. string("") + o + r should do the trick. –  Karoly Horvath Feb 20 '12 at 11:10
    
Thanks For your Nice Answer :) –  Stranger Feb 20 '12 at 11:32

it's not proper syntax use instead

case 's':
case 'g':
 cout << "Finish"; break;
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1  
wrong .. that's not what he asked. –  Karoly Horvath Feb 20 '12 at 8:48

You can't switch on multiple values in C++.

switch (o,t)

uses the comma operator (it looks a lot like a pair would in some other languages, but it isn't).
The comma operator evaluates its left operand (o), ignores the value of that, and then returns the value of its right operand (t).
In other words, your switch only looks at t. There is no way around this.

Your particular case is better written as

if (o == 's' && t == 'g')
{
    cout << "Finish";
}
else
{
    cout << "Nothing";
}
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@Stranger: This really should be posted as another question, but I'll answer anyway: char is actually an integer type, so o+t adds two integers (and the result is the sum of the ASCII codes for the characters). You can however do string r; r += o; r += t; to get what you're after. –  molbdnilo Feb 20 '12 at 10:02
char o,t; cin >> o >> t;
switch (o,t)
{
  case 's':
  case 'g': cout << "Finish"; break;
  default: cout << "Nothing";
}

In switch when matched case is found, all operator after that are executed. That's why you should write break; operator after case-es to exit switch. So if you want to do the same in several cases you should just put them one after another.

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1  
wrong .. that's not what he asked. –  Karoly Horvath Feb 20 '12 at 8:50

You have some syntax error, the correct code is

char o,t; cin >> o >> t;
switch (o)
{
  case 's':case 'g': cout << "Finish"; break;
  default: cout << "Nothing";
}

switch (t)
{
  case 's':case 'g': cout << "Finish"; break;
  default: cout << "Nothing";
}
share|improve this answer
1  
.. and another wrong one. –  Karoly Horvath Feb 20 '12 at 9:14
    
yi_H ...... y ?? –  Akhil Thayyil Feb 20 '12 at 9:16

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