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Code:

my $tmp='x $i y';  # define a macro or whatever

for my $i (0..5){
    my $var;
    #    eval { $var=$tmp; };       # A
    #    eval { $var="x $i y"; };   # B
    $var="x $i y";                  # C
    print $var."\n";
}

B and C would print

x 0 y
x 1 y
x 2 y

A print

x $i y
x $i y
x $i y

What's wrong in A?

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Anything wrong with sub not_macro { "x $_[0] y" }; print not_macro($_), "\n" for 0 .. 5; ? –  Chris Lutz Feb 20 '12 at 9:43
    
klortho #11903. –  hochgurgler Feb 20 '12 at 17:10
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4 Answers

up vote 2 down vote accepted

eval BLOCK only catches exceptions, so it's not relevant to the question. So that leaves us with the following code:

my $i;
my $tmp = 'x $i y';
$i = 3;
my $var = $tmp;

The right-hand side of the assignment is the same string in both cases, so why do you expect $tmp and $var to end up with different values? That makes no sense.

So how does one solve your problem? If you want the contents of $tmp to be used as a Perl code, you need to use eval EXPR, and the content of $tmp actually has to be Perl code.

my $i;
my $tmp = '"x $i y"';   # Quotes added to make it valid Perl.
$i = 3;
my $var = eval $tmp;    # eval EXPR instead of eval BLOCK.

But that's oh-so-wrong. You're using eval EXPR as template system. Use a real tempalte system, like Template-Toolkit. But if you want to keep using templates of the form x $i y, then look into String::Interpolate.

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If you eval $tmp, it will just return the string inside it, meaning you will do: $var = 'x $i y'. You need to eval the string in $tmp, but not $var. Also, you cannot directly eval the string, you need to enclose it in double quotes, to allow interpolation of $i, like so:

$tmp = '"x $i y"';  # note double quotes inside
...
$var = eval $tmp;

However, eval is rather a brutish solution to any such problem. Most of the times you think you need it, you need to think again. Your solution could be code references instead:

my $tmp = sub { my $num = shift; return "x $num y" };

for my $i (0 .. 5) {
    print $tmp->($i);
}

Here, you will not attempt to use the actual $i argument in the for loop, but instead pass $i as argument to the sub, who uses it and returns the string.

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Variable names in double-quoted strings are replaced with values, variables in single-quoted string are not (it's called interpolation). That's why the A options is printing $i instead of a value.

A does exactly the same as:

my $var = 'x $i y';
print $var."\n";     # prints 'x $i y\n';
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Well for starters, when you put a string in single quotes, it won't interpret your variables as being the values of them, but rather the literal string that you type.

Now as far as "making a macro", which is what you were trying to do. Here is a way to do it in perl, but honestly, code you write should never do this type of thing.

use strict;

# This is your "counter" variable
my $i = 0; 

# This is your "Macro"
my $macro = sub{ return 'x ' . ${\$i} . ' y'}; 

for my $x (0..5){

    $i = $x;
    print &{$macro}, "\n";

}

The result is:

x 0 y
x 1 y
x 2 y
x 3 y
x 4 y
x 5 y
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