Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

Can someone explain the output of the following code

char* a[] = {"ABC123", "DEF456", "GHI789"};
char **p = a;
cout<<++*p<<std::endl;
cout<<*p++<<std::endl;
cout<<++*p<<std::endl;

Output:

BC123
BC123
EF456

What is confusing to me is the different behavior of ++*p and *p++. I was expecting the output to be:

ABC123
DEF456
GHI789
share|improve this question
6  
Operator precedence. Add some parentheses and it'll come clear... –  jrok Feb 20 '12 at 10:21

5 Answers 5

up vote 3 down vote accepted
char* a[] = {"ABC123", "DEF456", "GHI789"};
char **p = a;
cout<<++*p<<std::endl; // 1
cout<<*p++<<std::endl; // 2
cout<<++*p<<std::endl; // 3

On line 1 first *p will be pointing to the element in the array "ABC123" and the ++ moves one forward and so 'BC123' is printed.

On line 2 *p is still pointing to BC123 so this is printed and then once printed the ++ is carried out. This moves the pointer to the 2nd element in the array

On line 3 it is the same as line 1. You have taken the contents of p (Now the 2nd element in the array) and moved one character in that string, thus printing EF456

(Also have a look at here Pointer arithmetic on string type arrays, how does C++ handle this? as I think it might be useful to get an understanding of what is happening)

To print what you expected the following would work:

cout<<*p++<<std::endl;
cout<<*p++<<std::endl;
cout<<*p++<<std::endl;

Or

cout<<*p<<std::endl;
cout<<*(++p)<<std::endl;
cout<<*(++p)<<std::endl;

Or various other ways (taking into account precedence as others have said)

share|improve this answer

Perhaps this will help. You example is roughly equivalent to this:

++(*p);
cout << *p << '\n';

cout << *p << '\n';
++p;

++(*p);
cout << *p << '\n';

Without parentheses, *p++ is parsed as *(p++) since suffix increment has got higher precedence than dereference operator. Increment is still done after the whole expression, though.

On the other hand, prefix increment and * have got same precedence, so ++*p is parsed right-to-left as ++(*p). Knowing that prefix increment has to be done before the expression, you can now put the whole picture together.

share|improve this answer
    
I got it... I was only taking operator precedence into picture, forgetting completely about the associativity.. Thanks –  Vivek Ranga Feb 20 '12 at 10:50

According to C++ operator precedence table, precedence of post-increment is higher than dereference (*) operator, and pre-increment and dereference operator have same precedence. Also pre-increment and dereference operator are right-to-left associative.

So in the first line (cout<<++*p<<std::endl;), * and ++ are evaluated from right to left (first dereference, then increment). Now p still point to the first array (because it has not changed),but (*p) points to the second letter of the first string (the output shows this fact).

In second line (cout<<*p++<<std::endl;) however post-increment is evaluated first (after retrieving the old value of p) and the p is incremented and now points to the second array. But before increment, the value of p is used in the expression and output of the second line is exactly as the first line.

In third line, first the p is dereferenced (point to the first letter of the second array), then incremented (point to the second letter of the second array), and the value is printed.

share|improve this answer

++*p is executed before printing. So increment pointer, then print. *p++ is executed after printing. Print, then increment.

share|improve this answer

Just a guess, but I think because you are incrementing the deferenced pointer using cout<<++*p<<std::endl;, what you are actually doing is incrementing the character at the start of the string that p points to then outputting this to the standard output.

Similarly cout<<*p++<<std::endl; is incrementing the character after outputting so the final cout<<++*p<<std::endl; results in two increments.

You should try this instead and see if it works

cout<<*(++p)<<std::endl; 
cout<<*(p++)<<std::endl; 
cout<<*(++p)<<std::endl; 
share|improve this answer
1  
The last line of that output causes it to go boom unfortunately. The ++p is moving it to beyond the end of the array –  Firedragon Feb 20 '12 at 11:00

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.