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#!/usr/bin/perl

    A();
    B();

    sub A {
        my @array = qw(value_1 value_2);
        $array_ref = \@array;
    }

    sub B {
        foreach my $i ( @{$array_ref} ) {
            print "Array Value: $i \n";
        }
    }

Since the array is declared using the 'my' keyword, could the array reference be lost ? Can any one brief me over this.

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3 Answers 3

up vote 7 down vote accepted

No, the scope of the variable expires, but not the memory address. The data will remain.

Isn't this something you could have simply tried? =) I just copy/pasted your code and tried it, and it worked fine.

For proper encapsulation, though, you really should return the array ref instead:

B(A());
# Or
my $aref = A();
B($aref);

sub A {
        my @array = qw(value_1 value_2);
        return \@array;
}

sub B {
    my $array_ref = shift;
    foreach my $i ( @$array_ref ) {
        print "Array Value: $i \n";
    }
}
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I definitely recommend using

use strict;

in Perl scripts (put it on the very beginning). In this very case it will complain about $array_ref being undeclared global. And it is likely the main source of the confusion: you use $array_ref without declaring it in any way, so it is treated as a global variable.

The array content itself is kept because it is referenced by this very variable so reference count remains greater than 0 (perl uses reference counting internally to keep track of when to remove variables).

Of course approach like shown in TLP posts (without globals) is to be recommended.

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Actually there is a very good reason to use my in this example.
You actually want the variable to be re-created every time through the subroutine, otherwise you would change the values that you got earlier.

use strict;
use warnings;
use 5.10.1;

my @array;
sub A{
  push @array, scalar @array; # add the length of @array to the end
  return \@array;
}

my @list;

for( 'A'..'D' ){
  my $current = A();
  push @list, $current;
  say join ' ', @$current;
}

say '';

say join ' ', @$_ for @list;
0
0 1
0 1 2
0 1 2 3

0 1 2 3
0 1 2 3
0 1 2 3
0 1 2 3

Notice how every copy of @array is identical.


This is why you need a new copy for every time the subroutine is called.

use strict;
use warnings;
use 5.10.1;

sub A{
  state $iter = 0;
  my @array;
  push @array, 0..$iter++;
  return \@array;
}

my @list;

for( 'A'..'D' ){
  my $current = A();
  push @list, $current;
  say join ' ', @$current;
}

say '';

say join ' ', @$_ for @list;
0
0 1
0 1 2
0 1 2 3

0
0 1
0 1 2
0 1 2 3
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