Stack Overflow is a community of 4.7 million programmers, just like you, helping each other.

Join them; it only takes a minute:

Sign up
Join the Stack Overflow community to:
  1. Ask programming questions
  2. Answer and help your peers
  3. Get recognized for your expertise

First of all there is probably no correct answer, but I'm sure there are people who knows more than me and will be able to assist.

I have 3 entities: User, Blog, Post.

The system can have any number of users.

User can have any number of blogs, but each blog have only one user.

Blog can have as many posts as the user will post, and all posts will be from the same user that owns the blog (i.e. if John owns blog Food, only John can post in this blog). And of course each post have one parent blog.

Then I have the user profile page, where I want to display all the user details, names of all his blogs, and last 5 posts.

I have then a blog page that displays details of the blog, the name of the owner (User) and titles of all posts.

Then I have post page that displays the post details, blog name and owner name.

As you see I have relations between all of them, but none of them can act as aggregate.

Its not that hard to define the entities in code, what I do have issues with is defining the repositories. How much do I need? 3 - one per each entity? 1 - for everything? How do I perform look-up?

For example to get the 5 last posts in the user page. User does not have reference to Posts, instead in holds a container of Blogs where each Blog in turn holds container of Posts. Should I have a method in my repository that accepts the UserID and returns a list of Posts? Or maybe it should be a Service? Also I don't usually perform loading of all the data but instead I have lazy loading. By retrieving an existing User entity, I would not load its blogs unless they are needed (when first time accessed).

Thanks in advance.

share|improve this question
    
What exactly do you mean by 'repository' vs. 'service'? IMO this question is far too broad for SO. – home Feb 20 '12 at 12:18
    
You can find the definitions here en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Domain-driven_design And yea I was a bit afraid that the question might be too broad for SO... – skwee357 Feb 20 '12 at 12:21
up vote 3 down vote accepted

I would create:

  • a PostRepository used to handle posts and comments
  • BlogRepository used mostly for searching
  • UserRepository

If you are not going to support comments I would remove the post repository and handle posts in the BlogRepository

I usually model the repositories after their usage and to avoid nesting of aggregates (more than two levels).

For example to get the 5 last posts in the user page. User does not have reference to Posts, instead in holds a container of Blogs where each Blog in turn holds container of Posts.

imho the user should not have a container to the Blog. You have the repository to fetch it.

Should I have a method in my repository that accepts the UserID and returns a list of Posts?

yes.

Or maybe it should be a Service?

Service is used to remove business logic from the code that uses the domain models. Don't create them until you get that kind of logic.

Also I don't usually perform loading of all the data but instead I have lazy loading. By retrieving an existing User entity, I would not load its blogs unless they are needed (when first time accessed).

Lazy loading can be avoided by not having properties that link all domain models together. Try to only have properties to child aggregates.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for the comment! Interesting solution, Ill think about it. I try to avoid nesting aggregates too, but its not always as simple as it sounds. – skwee357 Feb 21 '12 at 8:21
    
@skwee: Read my update. – jgauffin Feb 21 '12 at 8:22
    
Thanks that's a lot more cleaner and helpful! I have only one question: Why User should not have Blog container? From your answer it clearly simplifies the whole process, but I don't see why its wrong. I'm pretty sure your state of mind wasn't something like "since having blog container complicates fetching blogs and adds the need to implement lazy loading, Ill decide not to have blog container in User entity". There should be some logic or rules behind this decision. I'd like to know it. Thanks! – skwee357 Feb 21 '12 at 8:45
1  
I'm sorry for being picky :) But, why then have posts collection inside blog? Or why to have any reference from EntityA to EntityB? Why not just create repositories and use them, instead of having direct reference to other entities/collection of entities? – skwee357 Feb 21 '12 at 8:56
2  
Because the User object would have 50 different reference properties when your application have grown since a user has an relation to everything in a system. A Blog is dependent of it's posts (an empty blog is worthless), but a user is not dependent of it's blog. – jgauffin Feb 21 '12 at 9:04

User is often a typical aggregate root. The User aggregate may contain user preferences, user statistics, even Blogs maybe.

I also see Post as a good candidate for an aggregate root with a lot of things gravitating around it : Comments, Tags, Categories... You could then use PostRepository.LoadByBlog() or PostRepository.LoadByUser() for your pages.

Now this is only one possibility inferred from what you described. Every domain is unique and you might have game changing information we're not aware of.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for your comment! But please lets stick with the domain I described. The moment you add other entities (tags, categories) the domain changes drastically, and this is not good. The domain I described is the domain I have and this is the domain my questions raised from. I intentionally picked relatively simple domain because I don't want to complicate (not yet), because I lack the experience in DDD for now to make more complicated domains. – skwee357 Feb 20 '12 at 14:15
    
Even so, I'd still have these 2 aggregate roots and the corresponding repositories. Assuming you've got the user id as an input (from the URL or something like that), UserRepository.LoadById() will do the trick to display the user details. From there you can navigate down to the user's blogs to get their titles and PostRepository.LoadLatestFiveByUserId() will give you the 5 most recent posts. Then you can use PostRepository.LoadAllByBlog() and PostRepository.LoadById() for the other pages. – guillaume31 Feb 20 '12 at 14:44
    
You guessed correctly about the URL. I tough about the same solution (more or less) but in my solution I also had BlogRepository, but then a lot of code is duplicated (i.e. BlogRepository.GetById() will have to load the blog and the User, while UserRepository.GetById() will load the user and the Blogs so its sort of the same functionality copied over 2 repositories). – skwee357 Feb 20 '12 at 14:54
    
skwee, regarding your last comment. Yes, you can automate this and have something on the lines of var user = Repository.GetById<User>(); This would work, but the assumption is, that you routine for retrieving users will be the same for blogs and other entities. This is not always the case and quite often you will want to do something different. The only way for you to learn/understand is to keep trying it all out. Less code isn't always a good thing. – user338195 Feb 22 '12 at 19:15

I would look at significance of your entity, prior to deciding whether I'll have a repository or not.

Looking from test-driven development side, I would have a repository for each entity. This way I can have a fake implementation of IUserRepository, IBlogPostRepository etc. This approach promotes unit testing and allows me to substitute one implementation of repository with another.

I would then group my repositories into services as I feel suited. One way of doing this, is to write use cases and group in a way that suits your requirements.

For example, I can say that a User can do the following:

  1. View post
  2. Submit post
  3. Edit post

I can now make a IUserService for viewing, submitting and editing posts. This service will aggregate (group) my repositories.

At the end, I'll be able to do the following.

var blogPost = new BlogPost();
ServiceFactory.Resolve<IUserService>(c => c.SubmitPost(blogPost));

Now, this is one way of doing this.

Alternatively, you might have a IBlogPostService which would expose very similar behaviour, or you could just use the repositories and not implement an aggregate service.

Point that I"m trying to make, is that you should not hang up on small details. There are normally multiple ways of achieving similar behaviour, and the only way you will learn is by practising.

Make your repositories re-usable, but ask yourself whether you are over-engineering something, i.e. am I ever going to use this repository on its own? Once you have few repositories, wrap them in aggregate service.

If you service has more then 3 (threshold is entirely up to you) repositories, then consider refactoring this service into two separate services.

I hope this helps.

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.