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Here is the code:

#a.py
ALL_FUNC = [bar, foo]  #a list containing all the functions defined in this module

def bar():
    pass

def foo():
    pass

Then, I run it like this: $ python a.py NameError: name 'bar' is not defined

The error means, bar is not defined when ALL_FUNC = [bar, foo] is executed. But why can't the interpreter find the function bar in the module? Just because bar is defined after ALL_FUNC?

Look at this, here is a python class,

class A:
    def __init__(self):
        self.bar()

    def bar(self):
        pass

a = A()

Apparently, the above code will run without any error, but bar in A is also defined after where it's accessed (in __init__), why self.bar() can be found without any error?

Follow Up

Here is another module,

#b.py
def bar():
    print k  #well, apparently this line will result in an error
def foo():
    pass

if __name__ == '__main__':
    foo()

Then run it like this,

$ python b.py

NO ERROR! Why? bar is supposed to result in an error, isn't it? Just because it's not used in __main__, so the error isn't detected? But bar's definition is executed, right?

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2 Answers 2

The interpreter executes the script from top to bottom.

def is an executable statement. Any name created by def (such as foo and bar in your first example) does not exist until the relevant def statement has been executed.

Now to your second example: the name self.bar() is resolved when __init__() is called, and it's called after the entire class definition has been seen.

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So, when I run python a.py, the code in a.py will be interpreted line by line in order? No matter a function is used or not? –  Alcott Feb 20 '12 at 13:21
    
@Alcott: Exactly. Furthermore, the same name can refer to different functions at different points in your script. –  NPE Feb 20 '12 at 13:22
    
Well, I must be confused that, in C++'s template class, only those used functions will get instantiated and their code will be generated, but in python's module, all lines of code will be interpreted and executed, right? –  Alcott Feb 20 '12 at 13:25
    
@Alcott: Pretty much. In Python, everything is dynamic and things like class, def etc are actually executable statements. –  NPE Feb 20 '12 at 13:26
1  
@Alcott There are no templates in Python, not even remotely. Yes, all code is executed, but note that in this context, function declarations are "executed" only in that a default arguments are evaluated and the function object is created, nothing more. But generally, yes. –  delnan Feb 20 '12 at 13:27

But why can't the interpreter find the function bar in the module? Just because bar is defined after ALL_FUNC?

Because the code is executed in the order it appears in the file. Where you try to assign the values to ALL_FUNC the function definitions haven't been executed.

but bar in A is also defined after where it's accessed (in __init__), why self.bar() can be found without any error?

Because __init__ has been called after the class has been defined. Your class is instantiated by a = A(), after the class definition.


Response to Follow up

Why? bar is supposed to result in an error, isn't it? Just because it's not used in __main__, so the error isn't detected? But bar's definition is executed, right?

If you called bar() you'd get a NameError. When you defined the bar function, the function code was interpreted, not executed. I'm not sure whether this would ever pick up anything other than SyntaxErrors, but definitely not NameErrors.

However, bar won't always result in an error. Consider:

>>> def bar():
...   print(k)
...
>>> bar()
Traceback (most recent call last):
  File "<stdin>", line 1, in <module>
  File "<stdin>", line 2, in bar
NameError: global name 'k' is not defined
>>> k = "Foo"
>>> bar()
Foo
share|improve this answer
    
Original post edit. –  Alcott Feb 21 '12 at 0:39

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