Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I have seen structure declarations which looks like this one

typedef struct br {
        int year;
        int km;

} Car;

I know that I can use that structure like

Car ford;
ford.year = 1980;
ford.km = 12

But for what "br" stands in the declaration ?

share|improve this question
    
there are so many copies of this Q it would be hard to list them all. These are basics, read any tutorial (best case C standard) and you will find answer to this. Why upvotes? –  AoeAoe Feb 20 '12 at 13:40

8 Answers 8

up vote 12 down vote accepted

br is called the structure tag.

The new type created is struct br and Car is just a type alias for struct br.

This declaration

struct br ford;

is equivalent to this declaration:

Car ford;   // ford is of type struct br

Also the combo form:

typedef struct br {
    int year;
    int km;
} Car;

is equivalent to these declarations:

struct br {
    int year;
    int km;
};

typedef struct br Car;
share|improve this answer
    
So I can omit br, right ? I mean it is legal to use such a declaration typedef struct {... } Car; –  foho Feb 20 '12 at 13:33
    
@foho yes, in the combo form the structure tag is not required –  ouah Feb 20 '12 at 13:34
    
You really need the structure tag if you want a car pointer inside the struct. You can't define Car *p inside it, because Car isn't defined yet, but you can define struct br *p. –  ugoren Feb 20 '12 at 13:47

This is a combined declaration of struct and a type definition. Car is te name of a newly defined type; br is the structure tag. You can use it as follows:

struct br x;

This combined declaration is equivalent to the following two declarations:

struct br {
    int year;
    int km;
};

and

typedef struct br Car;
share|improve this answer

By using struct br{...}; you actually define a new type struct br;. Then you typedef this new type into a new type Car. The actual type is struct br. So br is just a placeholder for the structure tag in this case (since you don't use it).

share|improve this answer

br is the structure tag (or "name") of the structure. Read the typedef as "typedef the structure called br, which I'm declaring to contain int year and int km, to be also known as Car"

share|improve this answer

The thing here is that you are defining a struct br and then you are using typedef to use struct br with the alias Car.

So basically:

struct br ford;

is the same that

Car ford;

Take a look at the typedef documentation

share|improve this answer

Look at typedef syntax:

typedef "type" "name";

struct br {...} is what you "name" by typedef.

Part of programmers (lil me and Linus Torvalds for example) believe that typedefs in hands of beginners are deus ex machina of code.

I follow rule: "use typedefs when you are hiding something", many'd disagree though.

struct linked_list_element *head;

is prolly more clear than:

list *head;

share|improve this answer

In addition to the other answers given:

The struct tag is a superfluous feature if you are using typedef.

There is only one use for a struct tag together with typedef, and that is when the struct needs to reference itself. For example, a node in a linked list can be declared as:

typedef struct node
{
  struct node* next;
  int data;

} Node_t;

The next pointer will now point to structs of the type Node_t.

share|improve this answer

In your question shown below

typedef struct br {
        int year;
        int km;

} Car;

That there are br representing structure tag and Car is showing type definitions. You can also rewrite the code in following order.

struct br
{
        int year;
        int km;

} ;
typedef struct br Car;
share|improve this answer
    
what was the problem in the above code Gaurav vashishtha???????? –  Varun Chhangani Jun 14 '13 at 7:27

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.