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What is the difference between application server and web server?

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There are several variations on this question depending on context. –  Robert S. Jun 1 '09 at 19:05
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I found this link may be useful javarevisited.blogspot.in/2012/05/… –  Human Being Aug 8 '13 at 7:07
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20 Answers

Most of the times these terms Web Server and Application server are used interchangeably.

Following are some of the key differences in features of Web Server and Application Server:

  • Web Server is designed to serve HTTP Content. App Server can also serve HTTP Content but is not limited to just HTTP. It can be provided other protocol support such as RMI/RPC
  • Web Server is mostly designed to serve static content, though most Web Servers have plugins to support scripting languages like Perl, PHP, ASP, JSP etc. through which these servers can generate dynamic HTTP content.
  • Most of the application servers have Web Server as integral part of them, that means App Server can do whatever Web Server is capable of. Additionally App Server have components and features to support Application level services such as Connection Pooling, Object Pooling, Transaction Support, Messaging services etc.
  • As web servers are well suited for static content and app servers for dynamic content, most of the production environments have web server acting as reverse proxy to app server. That means while servicing a page request, static contents (such as images/Static HTML) are served by web server that interprets the request. Using some kind of filtering technique (mostly extension of requested resource) web server identifies dynamic content request and transparently forwards to app server

Example of such configuration is Apache Tomcat HTTP Server and Oracle (formerly BEA) WebLogic Server. Apache Tomcat HTTP Server is Web Server and Oracle WebLogic is Application Server.

In some cases the servers are tightly integrated such as IIS and .NET Runtime. IIS is web server. When equipped with .NET runtime environment, IIS is capable of providing application services.

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Nice explanation, +1 :) –  Keen Learner Jan 17 '13 at 21:53
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Good one. +1 ... –  chanchal1987 Aug 16 '13 at 17:12
    
+1 vote for very nice explanation –  Frank Myat Thu Nov 14 '13 at 14:21
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Both terms are very generic, one containing the other one and vice versa in some cases.

  • Web server: serves content to the web using http protocol.

  • Application server: hosts and exposes business logic and processes.

I think that the main point is that the web server exposes everything through the http protocol, while the application server is not restricted to it.

That said, in many scenarios you will find that the web server is being used to create the front-end of the application server, that is, it exposes a set of web pages that allow the user to interact with the business rules found into the application server.

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+1 for app server not restricted to http explanation. –  coding_idiot Jul 5 '13 at 18:51
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As Rutesh and jmservera pointed out, the distinction is a fuzzy one. Historically, they were different, but through the 90's these two previously distinct categories blended features and effectively merged. At this point is is probably best to imagine that the "App Server" product category is a strict superset of the "web server" category.

Some history. In early days of the Mosaic browser and hyperlinked content, there evolved this thing called a "web server" that served web page content and images over HTTP. Most of the content was static, and the HTTP 1.0 protocol was just a way to ship files around. Quickly the "web server" category evolved to include CGI capability - effectively launching a process on each web request to generate dynamic content. HTTP also matured and the products became more sophisticated, with caching, security, and management features. As the technology matured, we got company-specific Java-based server-side technology from Kiva and NetDynamics, which eventually all merged into JSP. Microsoft added ASP, I think in 1996, to Windows NT 4.0. The static web server had learned some new tricks, so that it was an effective "app server" for many scenarios.

In a parallel category, the app server had evolved and existed for a long time. companies delivered products for Unix like Tuxedo, TopEnd, Encina that were philosophically derived from Mainframe application management and monitoring environments like IMS and CICS. Microsoft's offering was Microsoft Transaction Server (MTS), which later evolved into COM+. Most of these products specified "closed" product-specific communications protocols to interconnect "fat" clients to servers. (For Encina, the comms protocol was DCE RPC; for MTS it was DCOM; etc.) In 1995/96, these traditional app server products began to embed basic HTTP communication capability, at first via gateways. And the lines began to blur.

Web servers got more and more mature with respect to handling higher loads, more concurrency, and better features. App servers delivered more and more HTTP-based communication capability.

At this point the line between "app server" and "web server" is a fuzzy one. But people continue to use the terms differently, as a matter of emphasis. When someone says "web server" you often think HTTP-centric, web UI, oriented apps. When someone says "App server" you may think "heavier loads, enterprise features, transactions and queuing, multi-channel communication (HTTP + more). But often it is the same product that serves both sets of workload requirements.

  • WebSphere, IBM's "app server" has its own bundled web server.
  • WebLogic, another traditional app server, likewise.
  • Windows, which is Microsoft's App Server (in addition to being its File&Print Server, Media Server, etc.), bundles IIS.
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As many have said before, web servers handle HTTP petitions, while application servers handle petitions for distributed components. So, maybe the easiest way to understand the difference is to compare the two products in regards to programming environment they offer.

Web Server -> Programming Environment

IIS : ASP (.NET)

Tomcat : Servlet

Jetty : Servlet

Apache : Php, CGI

Application Servers -> Programming Environment

MTS : COM+

WAS : EJB

JBoss : EJB

WebLogic Application Server : EJB

The crucial difference is that application servers support some distributed component technology, providing features like remote invocation and distributed transactions, like EJB in Java world or COM+ on Microsoft platform. Http server often support some more simple programming environments, often scripting, like ASP (.NET) in case of Microsoft or Servlet--based, including JSP and many other in case of Java or PHP and CGI in case of Apache.

Other capabilities like load-balancing, clustering, session-failover, connection pooling etc. that used to be in the realm of application servers, are becoming available on web servers as well directly or through some third party products.

Finally, it is worth noting that the picture is further distorted with "lightweight containers" like Spring Framework, that often supplement the purpose of application servers in more simple manner and without the application server infrastructure. And since distribution aspect in applications is moving from distributed component towards service paradigm and SOA architecture, there is less and less space left for traditional application servers.

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A Web server exclusively handles HTTP/HTTPS requests. It serves content to the web using HTTP/HTTPS protocol.

An application server serves business logic to application programs through any number of protocols, possibly including HTTP. The application program can use this logic just as it would call a method on an object. In most cases, the server exposes this business logic through a component API, such as the EJB (Enterprise JavaBean) component model found on Java EE (Java Platform, Enterprise Edition) application servers. The main point is that the web server exposes everything through the http protocol, while the application server is not restricted to it. An application server thus offers much more services than an web server which typically include:

  • A (proprietary or not) API
  • Load balancing, fail over...
  • Object life cycle management
  • State management (session)
  • Resource management (e.g. connection pools to database)

Most of the application servers have Web Server as integral part of them, that means App Server can do whatever Web Server is capable of. Additionally App Server have components and features to support Application level services such as Connection Pooling, Object Pooling, Transaction Support, Messaging services etc.

An application server can (but doesn't always) run on a web server to execute program logic, the results of which can then be delivered by the web server. That's one example of a web server/application server scenario. A good example in the Microsoft world is the Internet Information Server / SharePoint Server relationship. IIS is a web server; SharePoint is an application server. SharePoint sits "on top" of IIS, executes specific logic, and serves the results via IIS. In the Java world, there's a similar scenario with Apache and Tomcat, for example.

As web servers are well suited for static content and app servers for dynamic content, most of the production environments have web server acting as reverse proxy to app server. That means while service a page request, static contents such as images/Static html is served by web server that interprets the request. Using some kind of filtering technique (mostly extension of requested resource) web server identifies dynamic content request and transparently forwards to app server.

Example of such configuration is Apache HTTP Server and BEA WebLogic Server. Apache HTTP Server is Web Server and BEA WebLogic is Application Server. In some cases, the servers are tightly integrated such as IIS and .NET Runtime. IIS is web server. when equipped with .NET runtime environment IIS is capable of providing application services


Web Server                               Programming Environment
Apache                                   PHP, CGI
IIS (Internet Information Server)        ASP (.NET)
Tomcat                                   Servlet
Jetty                                    Servlet

Application Server                       Programming Environment
WAS (IBM's WebSphere Application Server) EJB
WebLogic Application Server (Oracle's)   EJB
JBoss AS                                 EJB
MTS                                      COM+
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In short a web server is a server that serves web pages to users via http. An application server is a server that hosts the business logic for a system. It often hosts both long running/batch processes and/or a interop services not meant for human consumption (REST/JSON services, SOAP, RPC, etc).

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What does the term 'host's the business logic' mean? How is it performed? –  TwiggedToday Jun 2 '09 at 11:47
    
Is the business logic exposed to the client through web services? –  TwiggedToday Jun 2 '09 at 11:49
    
It can be served via web-services, or it can be served by any other interface (TCP, MQ, flat files on a share (I don't recommend the last)). –  C. Ross Nov 8 '09 at 20:20
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An application server is typically designed and deployed to facilitate longer running processes that will also be more resource intensive.

A web server is used for short bursts that are not resource intensive, generally. This is mostly to facilitate serving up web based traffic.

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On a first hand, a web server serves web content (HTML and static content) over the HTTP protocol. On the other hand, an application server is a container upon which you can build and expose business logic and processes to client applications through various protocols including HTTP in a n-tier architecture.

An application server thus offers much more services than an web server which typically include:

  • A (proprietary or not) API
  • Object life cycle management,
  • State management (session),
  • Resource management (e.g. connection pools to database),
  • Load balancing, fail over...

AFAIK, ATG Dynamo was one of the very first application server in late 90's (according to the definition above). In early 2000, it was the reign of some proprietary application servers like ColdFusion (CFML AS), BroadVision (Server-side JavaScript AS), etc. But none really survived the Java application server era.

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In Java terms there's one more: web container (or more strictly, servlet container). It's, say, in between web server and application server. An web container is in Java terms an application server which basically only implements the JSP/Servlet part of Java EE and lacks several core parts of Java EE, such as EJB support. An example is Apache Tomcat.

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A web server runs the HTTP protocol to serve web pages. An application server can (but doesn't always) run on a web server to execute program logic, the results of which can then be delivered by the web server. That's one example of a web server/application server scenario.

A good example in the Microsoft world is the Internet Information Server / SharePoint Server relationship. IIS is a web server; SharePoint is an application server. SharePoint sits "on top" of IIS, executes specific logic, and serves the results via IIS.

In the Java world, there's a similar scenario with Apache and Tomcat, for example.

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Biggest difference is a Web Server handles HTTP requests, while an Application server will execute business logic on any number of protocols.

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There is not necessarily a clear dividing line. Nowadays, many programs combine elements of both - serving http requests (web server) and handling business logic (app server)

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An application server is a machine (an executable process running on some machine, actually) that "listens" (on any channel, using any protocol), for requests from clients for whatever service it provides, and then does something based on those requests. (may or may not involve a respose to the client)

A Web server is process running on a machine that "listens" specifically on TCP/IP Channel using one of the "internet" protocols, (http, https, ftp, etc..) and does whatever it does based on those incoming requests... Generally, (as origianly defined), it fetched/generated and returned an html web page to the client, either fetched from a static html file on the server, or constructed dynamically based on parameters in the incoming client request.

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can u please give examples for bath cases. –  frewper Dec 20 '12 at 5:59
    
Examples for bath cases: see here, here, and here. –  mquander Feb 11 at 6:58
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While there may be overlaps between the two (some web servers may even be used as application servers) the biggest difference IMHO is in the processing model and the session management:

In Web server processing model, the focus is on handling requests; the notion of "session" is pretty much virtual. That is to say that "session" is simulated by transferring the representation of state between client and server (hence REST) and/or serializing it to an external persistent storage (SQL Server, Memcached etc).

In Application server the session is usually more explicit and often takes form of an object living in memory of the application server for the entire duration of the "session".

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It depends on the specific architecture. Some application servers may use web protocols natively (XML/RPC/SOAP over HTTP), so there is little technical difference. Typically a web server is user-facing, serving a variety of content over HTTP/HTTPS, while an application server is not user-facing and may use non-standard or non-routable protocols. Of course with RIA/AJAX, the difference could be further clouded, serving only non-HTML content (JSON/XML) to clients pumping particular remote access services.

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A web server may be typically public facing, many companies use internal facing web server. Public facing is not a good example of the difference between web and application servers –  Elizabeth Buckwalter Nov 1 '09 at 6:50
    
I'll revise it to say user-facing. –  Cade Roux Nov 1 '09 at 13:56
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Actually Apache is a web server and Tomcat is an application server. When as HTTP request comes to web server. Then static contents send back to browser by web server. Is there and logic do to done, then that request send to the application server. after processing the logic then response send to web server and send to the client.

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On a first hand, a web server serves web content (HTML and static content) over the HTTP protocol. On the other hand, an application server is a container upon which you can build and expose business logic and processes to client applications through various protocols including HTTP in a n-tier architecture.

An application server thus offers much more services than an web server which typically include:

  • A (proprietary or not) API
  • Object life cycle management,
  • State management (session),
  • Resource management (e.g. connection pools to database),
  • Load balancing, fail over
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Application server and web server in Java both are used to host Java web application. On Java J2EE perspective main difference between web server and application server is support of EJB. In order to run EJB or host enterprise Java application (.ear) file you need an application server like JBoss, WebLogic, WebSphere or Glassfish, while you can still run your servlet and JSP or java web application (.war) file inside any web server like Tomcat or Jetty. Application Server supports distributed transaction and EJB. While Web Server only supports Servlets and JSP. In terms of logical difference between web server and application server. web server is supposed to provide http protocol level service while application server provides support to web service and expose business level service e.g. EJB.

Application server are more heavy than web server in terms of resource utilization.

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This is a detailed answer with some scenarios to clearly understand the difference,similarity and how both can work in conjunction and all

Application Server is a term that sometimes is mixed with a web server. While a web server handles mainly HTTP protocols, the application server deals with several different protocols, including, but not limited, to HTTP.

The Web server's main job is to display the site content and the application server is in charge of the logic, the interaction between the user and the displayed content. The application server is working in conjunction with the web server, where one displays and the other one interacts.

The information traveling back and forth between the server and its client is not restricted to simple display markup, but to interaction between the two.

In most cases, the server creates this interaction through a component API, such as J2EE (Java 2 Platform), EJB (Enterprise JavaBean) and other different application software models.

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An example:

The best way to understand the difference between the scenarios where an application server works with the web server versus a scenario where there isn't an application server is through an online store.

Scenario 1: Web server without an application server

you have an online store with only a web server and no application server. The site will provide a display where you can choose a product from. When you submit a query, the site performs a lookup and returns an HTML result back to its client. The web server sends your query directly to the database server (be patient, I will explain this one in our next nugget) and waits for a response. Once received, the web server formulates the response into an HTML file and sends it to your web browser. This back and forth communication between the server and database server happens every time a query is run.

Scenario 2: Web server with an application server

if the query you want to run has already been done previously and no data has changed since then, the server will generate the results without having to send the request to the database server. This allows a real-time query where a second client can access the same info and receive real time, reliable information without sending another duplicate query to the database server. The server basically acts as an intermediate between the database server and the web server. This allows the information pulled to be reusable while in the first scenario, since this info is embedded in a particular and "customized" HTML page, this is not a reusable process. A second client will have to request the info again and receive another HTML embedded page with the info requested -highly inefficient. Not to mention that this type of server is very flexible due to its ability to manage its own resources, including security, transaction processing, messaging and resource pooling.

To support such a variety of complex tasks this server must have a built in redundancy, great processing power and high amount of RAM to handle all the data it's pulling in real time.

Hope this helps.

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That's not accurate/confusing, even for web applications (i.e. the term application-server applies to none-web apps). Considering web only: A web server includes software (apache, nginx) to handle web requests (http). An application server contains/exposes the application (e.g. php code). They might be the same machine, they might not - for example it'd be considered normal to have nginx on one machine (web server) forwarding requests to php-fpm on a different machine (application server) which doesn't itself have any http access (only exposing the port for php-fpm itself). –  AD7six Jun 8 at 9:56
    
@AD7six A Web server exclusively handles HTTP requests, whereas an application server handles business logic to application programs through any number of protocols including HTTP. –  Duraiamuthan Jun 8 at 11:52
    
My point there is the application server may handle http requests, it's by no means a requirement. the application server deals with several different protocols, including, but not limited, to HTTP <- that says it definitely does handle http requests - that's not accurate. –  AD7six Jun 8 at 12:01
    
After re-reading the examples given, I don't see any real clarity here - the descriptions relate mostly to caching. What aught to be clear is that a webserver is software, an application is software. if they are deployed on the same machine the machine can be referred to however you like. If they are on different machines it would be normal to refer to the one running the webserver as the webserver, and the one running the app as the appserver. You'd normally split things according to load and load balancing. Overall I find this answer doesn't add anything useful. –  AD7six Jun 8 at 12:22
    
@AD7six My answer is meant to complement the other answers i.e others answers already mean what you have asked its just an extension to that. –  Duraiamuthan Jun 16 at 7:56
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In the following link you can find some additional information about application server vs web server analyzing the building blocks of two popular middleware products.

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Link-only answers aren't what SO is looking for. -1. –  AD7six Jun 8 at 10:31
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