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In the following code segment, I am wondering why testvectors is not collected after the function call. I see memory usage go up to 270Mb and then stay there forever.

This function is directly called from Main.

private static void increaseMemoryUsage()
{
    List<List<float>> testvectors = new List<List<float>>();
    int vectorNum = 250 * 250;
    Random rand = new Random();

    for (int i = 0; i < vectorNum; i++)
    {
        List<Single> vec = new List<Single>();

        for (int j = 0; j < 1000; j++)
                {
            vec.Add((Single)rand.NextDouble());
        }
        testvectors.Add(vec);
    }
}
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Define "forever", and how do you check it? –  delnan Feb 20 '12 at 13:47
    
You can't tell anything about GC just looking at the RAM consumption. Try calling GC.collect or some equivalent and check what happens. –  Queequeg Feb 20 '12 at 13:49
    
Why would it need to be collected? Keep in mind the GC is as lazy as it can be, because collecting is always expensive. Just because an object is collectable doesn't mean it will be. It will be collected when the GC decides it needs to free up memory, not before. –  InBetween Feb 20 '12 at 13:50
    
also look at your code where you are creating vec = new List<Single>() you can correct this 2 different ways .. one after you do testvectors.Add(ver) add a line vec.clear(); vec = null; or remover the creation of vec to the outside of the for loop.. if you do not want to List to resize then you could also do List<Single> vec = new List<Single>(1000); for example same with List<List<float>> testvectors = new List<List<float>>(1000); do you understand why I am suggesting an initial size for your List<T> –  DJ KRAZE Feb 20 '12 at 13:52
2  
@Johnyy I suspect if you pushed it a bit harder, and then tried to a large amount of memory for something else, it would. –  Joe Feb 20 '12 at 14:22
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6 Answers

up vote 9 down vote accepted

Don't confuse garbage collection with reference counting. The memory is freed when the runtime decides, not always when it's no longer referenced. To quote:

Garbage collection occurs when one of the following conditions is true:

The system has low physical memory.

The memory that is used by allocated objects on the managed heap surpasses an acceptable threshold. This means that a threshold of acceptable memory usage has been exceeded on the managed heap. This threshold is continuously adjusted as the process runs.

The GC.Collect method is called. In almost all cases, you do not have to call this method, because the garbage collector runs continuously. This method is primarily used for unique situations and testing.

Read this if you're interested:

http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/0xy59wtx.aspx

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The GC can run when it wants. And that can be much later. There is no obligation to free some memory directly after the last reference goes away. Your array will get collected on the next Gen2 collection.

Unless you keep allocating memory, it will likely never run after the function returns.

You can manually trigger a GC with GC.Collect(), but that's generally discouraged.

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Letting GC run when it feels like it (rather than forcing it with GC.Collect()) is almost always the right thing to do. The system generally knows better than you do when an object is no longer being referenced, as well as how and when to reclaim stuff for optimal performance, and your forcing it just causes it to second-guess itself and run slower in many cases. It's a very rare case for an object to have to be reclaimed right away. –  cHao Feb 20 '12 at 13:54
1  
The system has less information than the programmer. For example it can't know, that you just killed the last reference to 200MB of data. So manually calling it, might be justified in that case. Unfortunately there is no nice way to tell the GC that you don't need a large amounts of memory anymore, without forcing it to run. –  CodesInChaos Feb 20 '12 at 14:00
1  
Might. Maybe. The system has less information for a particular object, but way more info overall. If it knows of another reference to that 200MB of data, then all you've done is cause that stuff to survive another GC (and potentially promote it into the next generation). So if you're going to force it, you better be damn sure you're right. –  cHao Feb 20 '12 at 14:03
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Most likely, your testvectors is getting promoted to the Large Object Heap (LOH) and then it is not collected during the Gen0 collection.

Good link here.

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I observe the opposite when I run this:

 class Program
    {
        static void Main(string[] args)
        {
            increaseMemoryUsage();

            Console.WriteLine("Hit enter to force GC");
            Console.ReadLine();

            GC.Collect();

            Console.ReadLine();
        }

        private static void increaseMemoryUsage()
        {
            var testvectors = new List<List<float>>();
            const int vectorNum = 250 * 250;
            var rand = new Random();

            for (var i = 0; i < vectorNum; i++)
            {
                var vec = new List<Single>();

                for (var j = 0; j < 1000; j++)
                    vec.Add((Single)rand.NextDouble());

                testvectors.Add(vec);
            }
        }    
    }
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yep GC.collect does bring it down. However, usage of GC.collect is not encouraged... So. –  Johnyy Feb 20 '12 at 13:56
    
True, the idea is that you don't need to get involved in GC, which is answer to your question; The memory isn't being reclaimed as soon as the references go out of scope. The point I'm making is that the objects are available for collection and will be collected when the CLR sees fit. –  Myles McDonnell Feb 20 '12 at 14:00
    
@McDonnell Point taken –  Johnyy Feb 20 '12 at 14:16
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Garbage collection is non-deterministic. It's up to GC to decide when is a good moment to do it.

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Try to add GC.GetTotalMemory(true) before and after increaseMemoryUsage() method usage and compare numbers.

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