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Given the object:

var firstObject = {
    key1 : 'value1',
    key2 : 'value2'
};

how can I copy the properties inside another object (secondObject) like this:

var secondObject = {
    key1 : 'value1',
    key2 : 'value2',
    key3 : 'value3',
    key4 : 'value4'
};

using a reference to the firstObject? Something like this:

var secondObject = {
    firstObject,
    key3 : 'value3',
    key4 : 'value4'
};

(this doesn't work... I put it just to show in big lines how I would like to structure the code).

Is a solution possible without using any JavaScript frameworks?

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3  
Answered here: stackoverflow.com/questions/171251/… –  Calvin L Feb 20 '12 at 14:30
    
The question is, do you want a shallow or a deep copy? If deep, how deep? –  georg Feb 20 '12 at 14:35
5  
FWIW, they're called "properties," not "attributes." –  T.J. Crowder Feb 20 '12 at 14:36
    
Here's something really ugly that works nonetheless (not actually recommended! Just a one-liner proof-of-concept): secondObject = JSON.parse('{' + JSON.stringify(firstObject).match(/^.(.*).$/)[1] + ',' + JSON.stringify(secondObject).match(/^.(.*).$/)[1] + '}'); –  Ben Lee Feb 20 '12 at 14:54
    
@T.J.Crowder: I corrected the question... thanks. –  Igor Popov Feb 20 '12 at 19:00

5 Answers 5

up vote 25 down vote accepted
for(var k in firstObject) secondObject[k]=firstObject[k];
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Perfect!!! I really like simple, elegant, one liner solutions :) thanks... –  Igor Popov Feb 20 '12 at 18:57
    
You're welcome ;) –  Michael Krelin - hacker Feb 20 '12 at 19:18
2  
@BenLee, what you're missing here is that Igor has shown the exact use he has for it, in which hasOwnProperty is useless. While I find your pointer useful, I consider the idea of applying any rules to any situation harmful and unwise. Like all these pattern-driven development practices that are going on, so don't take it personal… –  Michael Krelin - hacker Oct 3 '12 at 20:03
    
@MichaelKrelin-hacker, what you're missing here is that StackOverflow is not just for the benefit of the OP. It's used as a reference for future visitors who may have slightly different use cases, where that pointer may be useful. –  Ben Lee Oct 3 '12 at 21:39
3  
You omit a hasOwnProperty() test and things kinda keep working. Until they stop, because your objects became more complex over time. Except then it breaks mysteriously in an unrelated part of the code because too much was copied. And you don't have any context for debugging. JS sucks like that, so careful coding to prevent such problems from occurring is prudent. –  Eli Bendersky Sep 26 '13 at 21:08

Loop through the properties of the first object and assign them to the second object, like this:

var firstObject = {
    key1 : 'value1',
    key2 : 'value2'
};

var secondObject = {
    key3 : 'value3',
    key4 : 'value4'
};

for (var prop in firstObject) {
    if (firstObject.hasOwnProperty(prop)) {
        secondObject[prop] = firstObject[prop];
    }
}

The for-in loop isn't enough; you need hasOwnProperty. See http://bonsaiden.github.com/JavaScript-Garden/#object.forinloop for a detailed explanation of why.

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@RobW, I didn't think the OP is using reference in the technical sense. I think he just means natural-language "referring to". –  Ben Lee Feb 20 '12 at 14:32
1  
@RobW: The OP actually did say "copy." –  T.J. Crowder Feb 20 '12 at 14:35

Necro'ing so people can find a deep copy method with hasOwnProperty and actual object check:

var extend = function (original, context, key) {
  for (key in context)
    if (context.hasOwnProperty(key))
      if (Object.prototype.toString.call(context[key]) === '[object Object]')
        original[key] = extend(original[key] || {}, context[key]);
      else
        original[key] = context[key];
  return original;
};
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Unfortunately, you cannot put a reference to a variable in an object like that. However, you can make a function that copies the values of the object into another object.

function extend( obj1, obj2 ) {
    for ( var i in obj2 ) {
        obj1[i] = obj2[i];
    }
    return obj1;
}

var firstObject = {
    key1: "value1",
    key2: "value2"
};

var secondObject = extend({
    key3: "value3",
    key4: "value4"
}, firstObject );
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This will also copy native properties. And how about properties that are Objects themselves? –  KooiInc Feb 20 '12 at 15:06

This should work, tested here.

var secondObject = {
    firstObject: JSON.parse(JSON.stringify(firstObject)),
    key3 : 'value3',
    key4 : 'value4'
};

Note: this will not copy methods of firstObject
Note 2: for use in older browsers, you'll need a json parser
Note 3: assigning by reference is a viable option, especially if firstObject contains methods. Adjusted the given jsfiddle example accordingly

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I would have preferred a simple (one liner) solution... –  Igor Popov Feb 20 '12 at 14:41
1  
Well, now you have one ... –  KooiInc Feb 20 '12 at 14:49

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