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So, i want to get variable from other file's class function. Something like this :

file lang.php:
<?php
class lang
{
function get()
{
$dubs = "dubs";
}
}

?>  

file print.php:
<?php
require("lang.php");
lang::get();
echo $dubs;
?>

But this returns nothing.

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closed as not a real question by Gordon, CodeCaster, Felix Kling, jprofitt, Graviton Feb 21 '12 at 2:13

It's difficult to tell what is being asked here. This question is ambiguous, vague, incomplete, overly broad, or rhetorical and cannot be reasonably answered in its current form. For help clarifying this question so that it can be reopened, visit the help center. If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

    
because its not static –  Gordon Feb 20 '12 at 15:08
2  
Are you sure you grasp the concepts of object-oriented programming? –  CodeCaster Feb 20 '12 at 15:09
1  
Return the value form get and assign it to a variable. You should read about scope in PHP: php.net/manual/en/language.variables.scope.php. You'd also have to create an instance of the class before you can call get. I suggest to read php.net/manual/en/language.oop5.basic.php –  Felix Kling Feb 20 '12 at 15:09
    
what is that "it's"? –  user1019892 Feb 20 '12 at 15:09
1  
And you want to be able to access all of them in the caller? Then you have a fundamental design issue... stop coding and think about the overall problem again. –  Felix Kling Feb 20 '12 at 15:11

4 Answers 4

The variable $dubs can only be used inside the function get(), because you declared it there. If you want to use it outside, there are two options: or return its value in the function (add return $dubs at the end), and the do something like $a = lang->get();, or make it global, declaring it outside any function in the class. Which method to use depends on the propouse of the class and the function; if you are going to use the value in other functions of this class, then make it global.

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I don't want to declare it outside the function. –  user1019892 Feb 20 '12 at 15:18
    
Then return $dubs; in your function, and say $dubs = lang::get(); in your main code. –  cHao Feb 20 '12 at 15:22
    
I have a lot of variables in that function. –  user1019892 Feb 20 '12 at 15:27
    
If you want at them, then either declare them global or return an array containing the ones you want. Other than that, you're screwed -- local scope means the vast majority of those variables don't even exist once the function returns. –  cHao Feb 20 '12 at 15:31

The correct way would be

$lang = new lang();
$dubs = $lang->get();
echo $dbus;
share|improve this answer
    
Does lang::get() return anything? –  CodeCaster Feb 20 '12 at 15:11
    
No. I just want to get it's $dubs. –  user1019892 Feb 20 '12 at 15:19
    
What if it doesn't want you touching its $dubs? Hmm? –  cHao Feb 20 '12 at 15:20
    
What? Comments must be at least 15 characters in length. –  user1019892 Feb 20 '12 at 15:22
    
You clearly need clarification on the ideas of scope and visibility. $dubs only exists and is visible within lang::get. If lang::get wanted you to see $dubs, it would declare the variable as global or pass it somewhere or return it. That's just how things work. The absence of any of those means you don't get to see $dubs. Period. –  cHao Feb 20 '12 at 15:36

$dubs will only be visible within the function it was created. You are also calling the method as if it was a static one. You need to use the regular syntax:

class lang
{
    function get()
    {
        $dubs = "dubs";
        return $dubs;
    }
}

$lang = new lang()
echo $lang->get();
share|improve this answer
    
Still returns nothing. –  user1019892 Feb 20 '12 at 15:14
    
In this case, static vs not doesn't matter much. For backward-compatibility reasons (PHP4 did the bare minimum to support classes), static functions don't have to be labeled as such. –  cHao Feb 20 '12 at 15:19
    
Just noticed some more - updated my comment to reflect the scope of $dubs. –  Ben Feb 20 '12 at 15:23
    
I have a lot of variables in that function. –  user1019892 Feb 20 '12 at 15:28
    
If you create a variable (in this case $dubs) inside a method - it'll only ever be visible to code inside that method. You need to instead perhaps pass an argument to the method, and then echo out based on the argument. What you CAN'T do though, is call $dubs from anywhere other than inside get(). –  Ben Feb 20 '12 at 15:31

As Luan Nico suggested:

class lang
{
    function get()
    {
         return "dubs";
    }
}
$lang = new lang();
$dubs = $lang->get();

OR

class lang
{
    static function get()
    {
        return "dubs";
    }
}

$dubs = lang::get();

OR

class lang
{
    static function get(&$dubs)
    {
        $dubs = "dubs";
    }
}

lang::get($dubs);

OR

class lang
{
    static $dubs = "dubs";
}

$dubs = lang::$dubs;
share|improve this answer
    
Never mind just did in more crappy way. –  user1019892 Feb 20 '12 at 15:30

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