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I have base class (virtual), with some children, and an array with pointers on base classes. When I create new object and then add its adress to the array, its ok. But when instead of adding adress I use new class(), the PARENT function is called, not the CHILD. Example code:

class base
{
public:
    virtual int foo() {return 1;};
};

class child : public base
{
  int foo() {return 2;};
};

//somewhere in code...

vector<base*> arr;

//1. Its ok:
child one;
arr.push_back(&one);
cout<<arr[0].foo(); //Its 2

//2. Its not ok...
arr.push_back(new child())

cout<<arr[1].foo(); //Its 1...

Thanx for ay help...

EDIT:

Im sorry, it was compiler fault - Downloaded MinGW and works fine... Sorry for problem...

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3  
Please create a complete, minimal program that demonstrates the error. sscce.org –  Robᵩ Feb 20 '12 at 15:26
    
works fine for me on ideone –  amit Feb 20 '12 at 15:29
    
The code you present should not have that behavior. If that is really the code and you are seeing that effect, check that the compiler is correctly installed, as it is misbehaving., but I doubt it. I am more inclined to think that you are not presenting the real code.... –  David Rodríguez - dribeas Feb 20 '12 at 15:29
    
@Rob its complete, ive just skipped the #include, namespace and main, sorry for that im in a hurry now... –  kittyPL Feb 20 '12 at 15:29
    
works fine for me on visual studio 8. What compiler are you using? –  Nate Feb 20 '12 at 15:29

4 Answers 4

up vote 2 down vote accepted

foo is not public in child

class child : public base
{   
public:
  int foo() {return 2;};
};  

also while I am here it should be

arr[0]->foo();

so

child one;
arr.push_back(&one);
arr.push_back(new child());
for(const base* b : arr)//C++11
    std::cout << b->foo() << '\n';

result

2
2
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Yes, it's obvious that the code he posted isn't real. –  James McLaughlin Feb 20 '12 at 15:32
    
Well other than the dereferencing issue and a missing ; it builds and executes fine using Apple clang++ 3.0 and Apple llvm-g++ 4.2.1 –  cli_hlt Feb 20 '12 at 15:36
    
@cli_hlt to be honest I aren't entirely sure how the protection level should interact with virtual functions, but I do know I is a lot cleaner (and clearer) to ensure that a overidden functions have the same protection level as the base. –  111111 Feb 20 '12 at 15:37
    
@111111 Yeah I am absolutely on your side here, I just wanted to state that it indeed compiles and executes nicely. –  cli_hlt Feb 20 '12 at 15:40

Well, your provided example should not compile at all as you are declaring a vector<base*> and are accessing its elements using the . operator. If that compiles, your compiler is broken, so better delete it and install a decent one.

Other than that, do a

arr[0]->foo();

and

arr[1]->foo();

That should work fine.

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The foo function must be public. Moreover, since you have a vector of "pointer to base", you must dereference (*arr[i]) its elements in order to call foo function, otherwise the code is not built.

#include <iostream>
#include <stdio.h>
#include <vector>

using namespace std;

class base
{
public:
    virtual int foo() {return 1;};
};

class child : public base
{
public:   // correction # 0
  int foo() {return 2;};
};

int main( int argc, const char* argv[] )
{
    vector<base*> arr;

    child one;
    arr.push_back(&one);
    cout << (*arr[0]).foo() << endl;   // correction # 1

    arr.push_back(new child());
    cout << (*arr[1]).foo() << endl;   // correction # 2
}
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I've tried your code using Apple's LLVM compiler and tested it. Your mileage may vary depending upon the compiler you use.

  • 111111 is right in that the method should be public in the child class. LLVM didn't care and gave 2 as a result in both cases.
  • Missing a semi-colon after arr.push_back(new child());
  • You should be referencing arr[0]->foo() (arr[0] is of type base*, a vector of pointers)
  • Pushing back a reference of a stack variable is typically a bad idea (just noting even though it probably was done to show the problem)

As I type new answers are being added!

Here's some working code:

#include <iostream>
#include <vector>

using namespace std;

class base
{
public:
    virtual int foo() {return 1;};
};

class child : public base
{
    int foo() {return 2;};
};

int main (int argc, const char * argv[])
{
    vector<base*> arr;

    //1. Its ok:
    child one;
    arr.push_back(&one);
    cout<<arr[0]->foo() << endl; //Its 2

    //2. Its not ok...
    arr.push_back(new child());

    cout<<arr[1]->foo() << endl; //Its 2...
    return 0;
}
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