Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

UPDATE: The following code only makes sense in C#4.0 (Visual Studio 2010)

It seems like I am having some misunderstanding of covariance/contravariance thing. Can anybody tell me why the following code doesn't compile?

public class TestOne<TBase>
{
    public IEnumerable<TBase> Method<TDerived>(IEnumerable<TDerived> values)
        where TDerived: TBase
    {
        return values;
    }
}

while this one compiles: (!!!)

public interface IBase
{
}
public interface IDerived: IBase
{
}
public class TestTwo
{
    public IEnumerable<IBase> Method(IEnumerable<IDerived> values)
    {
        return values;
    }
}
share|improve this question

3 Answers 3

up vote 13 down vote accepted

Covariance only applies to reference types (for the type arguments), so you have to add a class constraint:

public IEnumerable<TBase> Method<TDerived>(IEnumerable<TDerived> values)
    where TDerived : class, TBase
{
    return values;
}

This will prevent you from trying to convert, say, an IEnumerable<int> into an IEnumerable<object>, which is invalid.

share|improve this answer
    
@Adam : I believe you are wrong, IEnumerable<ISuper> is not IEnumerable<IBase> by default so it wouldn't compile even in 3.5 –  sll Feb 20 '12 at 15:39
1  
@AdamMihalcin: No, that code wouldn't have compiled before .NET 4. I've just tried it myself to verify that. Without generic invariance, the conversion from IEnumerable<ISuper> to IEnumerable<IBase> is simply invalid. –  Jon Skeet Feb 20 '12 at 15:39
    
good call on TSuper, just fixed that –  Aleksey Bykov Feb 20 '12 at 15:42
    
@bonomo: Okay, fixed my answer in line with the question change :) –  Jon Skeet Feb 20 '12 at 15:46

I cannot think of any situation where you actually need TDerived. Using TBase is sufficient:

public class TestOne<TBase>
{
    public IEnumerable<TBase> Method(IEnumerable<TBase> values)
    {
        return values;
    }
}

After all, you have no information about TDerived apart from the fact that it is a TBase...

share|improve this answer
2  
unfortunately it is not something I made up for the sake of complexity, it's a real situation that I ended up having in my code –  Aleksey Bykov Feb 20 '12 at 15:45
1  
@bonomo: That's interesting, I would love to see a more detailed example for future reference. :-) –  linepogl Feb 20 '12 at 15:49

Neither compiled for me initially. Both failed on the implicit cast from Super(T/I) to Base(T/I). When I added an explicit case, however, both compiled.

public IEnumerable<TBase> Method<TSuper>(IEnumerable<TSuper> values)
    where TSuper: TBase
    {
        return (IEnumerable<TBase>) values;
    }
share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.