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I have written a sudoku solver in Haskell. It goes through a list and when it finds '0' (an empty cell) it will get the numbers that could fit and try them:

import Data.List (group, (\\), sort)
import Data.Maybe (fromMaybe)

row :: Int -> [Int] -> [Int]
row y grid = foldl (\acc x -> (grid !! x):acc) [] [y*9 .. y*9+8]
    where y' = y*9
column :: Int -> [Int] -> [Int]
column x grid = foldl (\acc n -> (grid !! n):acc) [] [x,x+9..80]
box :: Int -> Int -> [Int] -> [Int]
box x y grid = foldl (\acc n -> (grid !! n):acc) [] [x+y*9*3+y' | y' <- [0,9,18], x <- [x'..x'+2]]
    where x' = x*3

isValid :: [Int] -> Bool
isValid grid = and [isValidRow, isValidCol, isValidBox]
    where isValidRow = isValidDiv row
          isValidCol = isValidDiv column
          isValidBox = and $ foldl (\acc (x,y) -> isValidList (box x y grid):acc) [] [(x,y) | x <- [0..2], y <- [0..2]]
          isValidDiv f = and $ foldl (\acc x -> isValidList (f x grid):acc) [] [0..8]
          isValidList = all (\x -> length x <= 1) . tail . group . sort -- tail removes entries that are '0'

isComplete :: [Int] -> Bool        
isComplete grid = length (filter (== 0) grid) == 0

solve :: Maybe [Int] -> Maybe [Int]
solve grid' = foldl f Nothing [0..80]
    where grid = fromMaybe [] grid' 
          f acc x
            | isValid grid = if isComplete grid then grid' else f' acc x
            | otherwise    = acc
          f' acc x 
            | (grid !! x) == 0 = case guess x grid of 
                Nothing -> acc
                Just x -> Just x
            | otherwise        = acc

guess :: Int -> [Int] -> Maybe [Int]
guess x grid
    | length valid /= 0 = foldl f Nothing valid
    | otherwise         = Nothing
    where valid = [1..9] \\ (row rowN grid ++ column colN grid ++ box (fst boxN) (snd boxN) grid) -- remove numbers already used in row/collumn/box
          rowN = x `div` 9 -- e.g. 0/9=0 75/9=8
          colN = x - (rowN * 9) -- e.g. 0-0=0 75-72=3
          boxN = (colN `div` 3, rowN `div` 3)
          before x = take x grid
          after x = drop (x+1) grid
          f acc y = case solve $ Just $ before x ++ [y] ++ after x of
            Nothing -> acc
            Just x -> Just x

For some puzzles this works, for example this one:

sudoku :: [Int]
sudoku = [5,3,0,6,7,8,0,1,2,
          6,7,0,0,0,0,3,4,8,
          0,0,8,0,0,0,5,0,7,
          8,0,0,0,0,1,0,0,3,
          4,2,6,0,0,3,7,9,0,
          7,0,0,9,0,0,0,5,0,
          9,0,0,5,0,7,0,0,0,
          2,8,7,4,1,9,6,0,5,
          3,0,0,2,8,0,1,0,0]

Took under a second, however this one:

sudoku :: [Int]
sudoku = [5,3,0,0,7,0,0,1,2,
          6,7,0,0,0,0,3,4,8,
          0,0,0,0,0,0,5,0,7,
          8,0,0,0,0,1,0,0,3,
          4,2,6,0,0,3,7,9,0,
          7,0,0,9,0,0,0,5,0,
          9,0,0,5,0,7,0,0,0,
          2,8,7,4,1,9,6,0,5,
          3,0,0,2,8,0,1,0,0]

I have not seen finish. I don't think this is a problem with the method, as it does return correct results.

Profiling showed that most of the time was spent in the "isValid" function. Is there something obviously inefficient/slow about that function?

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2 Answers

up vote 6 down vote accepted

The implementation is of course improvable, but that's not the problem. The problem is that for the second grid, the simple guess-and-check algorithm needs a lot of backtracking. Even if you speed up each of your functions 1000-fold, there will be grids where it still needs several times the age of the universe to find the (first, if the grid is not unique) solution.

You need a better algorithm to avoid that. A fairly efficient method to avoid such cases is to guess the square with the least number of possibilities first. That doesn't avoid all bad cases, but reduces them much.

One thing that you should also do is replace the length thing == 0 check with null thing. With the relatively short lists occurring here, the effect is limited, but in general it can be dramatic (and in general you should also not use length list <= 1, use null $ drop 1 list instead).

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isValidList = all (\x -> length x <= 1) . tail . group . sort -- tail removes entries that are '0'

If the original list does not contain any zeros, tail will remove something else, perhaps a list of two ones. I'd replace tail . group. sort with group . sort . filter (/= 0).

I don't understand why isValidBox and isValidDiv use foldl as map appears to be adequate. Have I missed something / are they doing something terribly clever?

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