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In Java, I'd like to have something as:

class Clazz<T> {
  static void doIt(T object) {
    // shake that booty
  }
}

But I get

Cannot make a static reference to the non-static type T

I don't understand generics beyond the basic uses and thus can't make much sense of that. It doesn't help that I wasn't able to find much info on the internet about the subject.

Could someone clarify if such use is possible, by a similar manner? Also, why was my original attempt unsuccessful?

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7 Answers 7

up vote 118 down vote accepted

You can't use a class's generic type parameters in static methods or static fields. The class's type parameters are only in scope for instance methods and instance fields. For static fields and static methods, they are shared among all instances of the class, even instances of different type parameters, so obviously they cannot depend on a particular type parameter.

It doesn't seem like your problem should require using the class's type parameter. If you describe what you are trying to do in more detail, maybe we can help you find a better way to do it.

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7  
Upvoted, this answer actually explains the poster's problem instead of just providing a workaround. –  Jorn Jun 1 '09 at 23:20
1  
I thought there would be a whole differente class for each type parameter, so Clazz<Integer>.doIt() wouldn't be the same method as Clazz<Long>.doIt(). I guess I was wrong. Really need to read something more in depth about generics. –  André Neves Jun 2 '09 at 20:05
5  
@Andre: Your intuition is not unfounded; C# does indeed treat generics this way. –  apollodude217 Nov 26 '10 at 14:25
8  
"For static fields and static methods, they are shared among all instances of the class, even instances of different type parameters..." Ouch! Kicked in the nuts by type erasure again! –  BD at Rivenhill Apr 13 '11 at 18:26
2  
if you will look how generic class/methods looks after compilation, you will see that generic attribute is removed. And List<Integer> after compilation looks like "List". So there's no different between List<Integer> and List<Long> after compilation - both became List. –  Dainius May 28 '12 at 9:45

Java doesn't know what T is until you instantiate a type.

Maybe you can execute static methods by calling Clazz.doit(something) but it sounds like you can't.

The other way to handle things is to put the type parameter in the method itself:

static <U> void doIt(U object)

which doesn't get you the right restriction on U, but it's better than nothing....

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Then I'd call the method without specifying any constraints, ie Clazz.doIt(object) instead of Clazz<Object>.doIt(object), right? Do you consider that OK? –  André Neves Jun 1 '09 at 19:45
    
The second syntax there is the more exact one, which you need if the compiler can't infer the type of the return value from the contaxt in which the method is called. In other words, if the compiler allows Clazz.doIt(object), then do that. –  skaffman Jun 1 '09 at 19:57
    
I tried Clazz<Object>.doIt(object) and got a compile-time error! "Syntax error on token(s), misplaced construct(s)". Clazz.doIt(object) works fine though, not even a warning. –  André Neves Jun 1 '09 at 20:14
4  
Use Clazz.<Object>doIt(object). I think it's weird syntax, comparing to C++'s Clazz<int>::doIt(1) –  Crend King Mar 1 '12 at 2:17

I ran into this same problem. I found my answer by downloading the source code for Collections.sort in the java framework. The answer I used was to put the genaric in the method, not in the class definition.

So this worked:

public class QuickSortArray  {
    public static <T extends Comparable> void quickSort(T[] array, int bottom, int top){
//do it
}

}

Of course, after reading the answers above I realized that this would be an acceptable alternative without using a genaric class:

public static void quickSort(Comparable[] array, int bottom, int top){
//do it
}
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4  
While the accepted answer was technically correct: this is this is actually what I was looking for when Google led me to this question. –  Jeremy List Oct 16 '13 at 3:29
    
Props for providing an example that includes the T extends XXX syntax. –  Ogre Psalm33 Nov 18 at 20:25

It is possible to do what you want by using the syntax for generic methods when declaring your doIt() method (notice the addition of <T> between static and void in the method signature of doIt()):

class Clazz<T> {
  static <T> void doIt(T object) {
    // shake that booty
  }
}

I got Eclipse editor to accept the above code without the Cannot make a static reference to the non-static type T error and then expanded it to the following working program (complete with somewhat age-appropriate cultural reference):

public class Clazz<T> {
  static <T> void doIt(T object) {
    System.out.println("shake that booty '" + object.getClass().toString()
                       + "' !!!");
  }

  private static class KC {
  }

  private static class SunshineBand {
  }

  public static void main(String args[]) {
    KC kc = new KC();
    SunshineBand sunshineBand = new SunshineBand();
    Clazz.doIt(kc);
    Clazz.doIt(sunshineBand);
  }
}

Which prints these lines to the console when I run it:

shake that booty 'class com.eclipseoptions.datamanager.Clazz$KC' !!!
shake that booty 'class com.eclipseoptions.datamanager.Clazz$SunshineBand' !!!

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In this case, does the second <T> hide the first one? –  André Neves May 14 '12 at 8:47
1  
@AndréNeves, Yes. The second <T> masks the first one in the same way that in class C { int x; C(int x) { ... } } the parameter x masks the field x. –  Mike Samuel May 24 '12 at 14:58
    
How to explain the output of the sample : it seems that there is indeed two types involved, one by parameter T value? If T was really hiding the class type I would expect "shake that booty 'class com.eclipseoptions.datamanager.Clazz" outputted twice without parameters. –  Pragmateek Dec 29 '12 at 18:36
    
It has nothing to do with masking. A static method simply can't be bound by the classes generic type. Nevertheless it can define its own generic types and boundaries. –  mike Aug 9 '13 at 11:08

Others have answered your question already, but in addition I can thoroughly recomment the O'Reilly Java Generics book. It's a subtle and complex subject at times, and if often seems to have pointless restrictions, but the book does a pretty good job of explaining why java generics are the way they are.

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Would that be "Java Generics and Collections" (oreilly.com/catalog/9780596527754)? –  André Neves Jun 1 '09 at 20:16
    
Yup, that's the one. –  skaffman Jun 2 '09 at 13:24

Something like the following would get you closer

class Clazz
{
   public static <U extends Clazz> void doIt(U thing)
   {
   }
}

EDIT: Updated example with more detail

public abstract class Thingo 
{

    public static <U extends Thingo> void doIt(U p_thingo)
    {
        p_thingo.thing();
    }

    protected abstract void thing();

}

class SubThingoOne extends Thingo
{
    @Override
    protected void thing() 
    {
        System.out.println("SubThingoOne");
    }
}

class SubThingoTwo extends Thingo
{

    @Override
    protected void thing() 
    {
        System.out.println("SuThingoTwo");
    }

}

public class ThingoTest 
{

    @Test
    public void test() 
    {
        Thingo t1 = new SubThingoOne();
        Thingo t2 = new SubThingoTwo();

        Thingo.doIt(t1);
        Thingo.doIt(t2);

        // compile error -->  Thingo.doIt(new Object());
    }
}
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Exactly as Jason S suggested. –  André Neves May 10 '12 at 9:50
    
The doIt method is missing a return type. –  Mike Samuel May 10 '12 at 21:26
    
@Mike your right, I have corrected the method signature –  ekj May 24 '12 at 10:05
    
@Andre the previous suggestion did not provide the restriction that U must extend Clazz –  ekj May 24 '12 at 10:07
    
I see, but it doesn't add anything useful except for the constraint. In my original post, I would like to be able to do this without passing U as a parameter. –  André Neves May 24 '12 at 16:07

When you specify a generic type for your class, JVM know about it only having an instance of your class, not definition. Each definition has only parametrized type.

Generics work like templates in C++, so you should first instantiate your class, then use the function with the type being specified.

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2  
Java generics are quite different from C++ templates. The generic class is compiled by itself. In fact the equivalent code in C++ would work (calling code would look like Clazz<int>::doIt( 5 ) ) –  David Rodríguez - dribeas Jun 1 '09 at 20:06
    
I like this answer better than the accepted one... apart from the C++ template reference, the comment about the generic type only being for one instance of the class instead of the entire class is spot on. The accepted answer doesn't explain this, and just provides a workaround which doesn't have anything to do with why you can't use the class's generic type in a static method. –  Jorn Jun 1 '09 at 23:18

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