Stack Overflow is a community of 4.7 million programmers, just like you, helping each other.

Join them; it only takes a minute:

Sign up
Join the Stack Overflow community to:
  1. Ask programming questions
  2. Answer and help your peers
  3. Get recognized for your expertise

I'm trying to reflect over some class properties and set them programaticlly, but it looks like one of my PropertyInfo filters isn't working:

//Get all public or private non-static properties declared in this class (no inherited properties) - that have a getter and setter.
PropertyInfo[] props = this.GetType().GetProperties(BindingFlags.DeclaredOnly | BindingFlags.Instance | BindingFlags.Public | BindingFlags.NonPublic | BindingFlags.GetProperty | BindingFlags.SetProperty );

I'm getting an error on the line

pi.SetValue(this, valueFromData, null);

Because the property has only a get{} method, no set{} method.

My question is, why wasn't this property filtered out of props? I thought that was the purpose of BindingFlags.SetProperty.

The property not getting filtered out is:

    public String CollTypeDescription
    {
        get { return _CollTypeDescription; }
    }

Note that I want to filter properties that won't work ahead of time, because I'm listing them all at once. I do not want to use pi.GetSetMethod() after the fact to determine whether I can use the setter.

share|improve this question
2  
@dtryon - no - he's OR-ing together the flags for the options he wants to set. – Rob Levine Feb 20 '12 at 15:57
up vote 33 down vote accepted

From the documentation:

BindingFlags.SetProperty

Specifies that the value of the specified property should be set. For COM properties, specifying this binding flag is equivalent to specifying PutDispProperty and PutRefDispProperty.

BindingFlags.SetProperty and BindingFlags.GetProperty do not filter properties that are missing setters or getters, respectively.

To check if a property can be set, use the CanWrite property.

if (pi.CanWrite)
    pi.SetValue(this, valueFromData, null);
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for the info - can't use CanWrite because this only reveals public setters, and I can still make use of private setters since I'm doing this from within the class. – Alain Feb 20 '12 at 16:10
    
@Alain -- Are you sure? I just did a test with a private property with a getter and setter. The CanWrite property returned true for that private property. – ken Feb 20 '12 at 16:16
    
Misunderstanding on my part. You're correct - the two are interchangeable, and since your method doesn't require a null test, it's preferable. – Alain Feb 20 '12 at 16:52
    
There is a peculiarity I discovered with a Silverlight property, ButtonBase.IsFocused, where its assembly internal setter will return true for CanWrite. It may be preferable to use pi.GetSetMethod != null if you need to avoid this consideration. – lthibodeaux May 15 '13 at 22:55

Thanks to ken for the information. It looks like the best solution I can get it to filter them out by testing GetSetMethod(true) in a LINQ filter:

//Get all public or private non-static properties declared in this class (no inherited properties) - that have a getter and setter.
PropertyInfo[] props = this.GetType().GetProperties(BindingFlags.DeclaredOnly | BindingFlags.Instance | BindingFlags.Public | BindingFlags.NonPublic).Where(p => p.GetGetMethod(true) != null && p.GetSetMethod(true) != null).ToArray();
share|improve this answer
    
See my comment on my answer. CanWrite is returning 'true' for me for private properties. Is it not working the same way for you? – ken Feb 20 '12 at 16:20

I understand the GetProperties() method so that it returns every property that has BindingFlags.GetProperty or BindingFlags.SetProperty.
So if you want only properties that have setters you must remove the BindingFlags.GetProperty flag. But I did not tested it so I can be wrong.

My answer got a -1. So it seems that my answer is wrong.

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.