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I'd like to know how can I declare a method will return an instance of a specific class.

For example:

The abstract class A declares a method (method1) that must return a instance of "List" the class B and C extends A. I want B to return an ArrayList and C to return a LinkedList.

How can I implement that? Thanks

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4  
Is this a homework question? –  Brian Driscoll Feb 20 '12 at 16:00
    
No.. just needed it in my program –  Addev Feb 20 '12 at 19:01

6 Answers 6

up vote 6 down vote accepted

If you want the caller to know that it's getting a LinkedList or ArrayList then you can leverage generics.

It would look something like this:

public abstract class A<T extends List<String>> {
    public abstract T method()
}

public class B extends A<ArrayList<String>> {
    public ArrayList<String> method() {
        //...
    }
}

public class C extends A<LinkedList<String>> {
    public LinkedList<String> method() {
        //...
    }
}

Or, if you are going to be interacting with B and C directly (not via A) then you can leverage covariant return types and simply have the subclasses declare the return type as ArrayList and LinkedList respectively. It is legal in Java 5+ to narrow the return type of an overridden method.

If the concrete type doesn't need to be known to the caller, then you just want to pass a strategy (i.e. a factory) for creating the list to A. This can be done by implementing a simple interface:

public interface ListFactory<T> {

    public List<T> newList();
}

and then passing it to the constructor of A. In fact, the factory can be used either way, however you only need classes B and C if you are in the first situation I described.

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Have A return a interface of type Collection(http://docs.oracle.com/javase/1.5.0/docs/api/java/util/Collection.html) Both LinkedList and ArrayList implement this interface so that B and C can return the required types.

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It's fairly straightforward. The key is that a subclass may override/implement using narrower type(s) than the overridden/implemented method in the superclass (return type, parameters and thrown exceptions)

public abstract class A<T> {
    public List<T> getList();
}

public class B<T> extends A<T> {
    public ArrayList<T> getList() {
        // some impl
    }
}

public class C<T> extends A<T> {
    public LinkedList<T> getList() {
        // some impl
    }
}

Here I've typed the class with the type of element in the list.

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This is actually known as the factory method pattern.

abstract class A{
    abstract public List<A> getList();
}

class B extends A{
    public List<A> getList(){return new ArrayList<A>();}
}

class C extends A{
    public List<A> getList(){return new LinkedList<A>();}
}
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  public abstract class A<T> {
    public abstract List<T> getList();
  }

  public class ArrayListB extends A<String> {
    public List<String> getList(){
      return new ArrayList<String>();
    }
  }

  public class LinkedListC extends A<String> {
    public List<String> getList(){
      return new LinkedList<String>();
    }
  }
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As easy as this:

abstract class A {
    abstract List<Integer> method1();
}

class B extends A {
    @Override
    public LinkedList<Integer> method1() {
        return new LinkedList<Integer>();
    }
}

This of course doesn't make Mark Peter's solution wrong, it's just an easier way to start off imho.

If you want to use the list with a type parameter of your choice, you could always write:

abstract class A<T> {
    abstract List<T> method1();
}

class B<T> extends A<T> {
    @Override
    public LinkedList<T> method1() {
        return new LinkedList<T>();
    }
}
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