Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I need to put a static array into a .cpp file. This array is only used in this .cpp so I want to declare it static. The array definition is quite big, so naturally I want to forward declare it.

static int bigIntArray[5000];

/* other code using bitIntArray */

static int bigIntArray[5000] = {
  0x00, 0x9900, 0xffee,
  ...
};

VC 9.0 gives an error: error C2086: 'int bigIntArray[5000]' : redefinition

If I change 'static' to 'extern', the problem goes away but I do not like this solution.

Why I can not forward declare a static variable? Is this required by the C++ standard?

share|improve this question
1  
Make sure to look at D.A.'s answer for a solution. –  Brent Aug 6 '13 at 19:15

9 Answers 9

At the risk of answering a slightly different question (yours was answered well by Charles Bailey), you might want to use an anonymous namespace with an extern. This prevents other translation units from accessing the array.

namespace {
    extern int bigIntArray[5000];
}

// Code that uses bigIntArray

namespace {
    int bigIntArray[5000] = { ... };
}

This might meet your need.

share|improve this answer
1  
"This prevents other translation units from accessing the array." You cannot refer to the array by the name bigIntArray in other TUs. Obviously, if you somehow get a pointer to it, you can access it. –  dyp Aug 6 '13 at 21:13
    
@DyP However, that's true even of static objects - once a pointer gets loose, any TU can access the object... –  twalberg Aug 6 '13 at 21:42
    
@twalberg Yes, because linkage is a property of a name, not of an object (object = a region of storage). Whether a name has internal linkage because of an anonymous namespace or because of the static specifier doesn't matter. –  dyp Aug 6 '13 at 22:31
    
anonymous namespaces should be preferred to static for this purpose anyway. –  Jack Aidley Aug 8 '13 at 11:16

It is only possible in C++ to forward declare an object if you use the extern keyword and do not specify an initializer. Any other attempt to declare an object will also be a definition. This implies that a forward declared object will have external linkage. It is not possible to forward declare a static object, i.e. one with internal linkage.

This is different from C where any declaration without an initializer is a tentative definition, subsequent definitions can be supplied but they must all specify the same linkage.

share|improve this answer
1  
This seems to be the right answer. It would be nice to add some spec references. –  D. A. Mar 14 '13 at 20:27

What's the problem with putting the definition (which also is a declaration) at the front and doing away with the "forward declaration"?

static int bigIntArray[5000] = {  0x00, 0x9900, 0xffee,  ...};

/* other code using bitIntArray */

Some people say the reason is "readability". The original poster didn't mention that as a motivation.

Anyway, I don't think that doing "odd" things justifies "readability". I think creating a new file type (eg, "*.def" below), is odd.

It doesn't seem to matter much (to me at least) where things are defined.

The cleanest, clearest. simplest thing to do is to move the definition to the top (and not be too concerned about "readability").

Other people say use "extern". The problem with that is that it opens the scope (potentially) of the object name beyond the one module.


It's also possible that the original poster doesn't realize that, in this context, "static" is a scope modifier (not a storage modifier.

share|improve this answer
    
Readability, I suppose. –  Christoffer Jun 1 '09 at 21:30
2  
You also need this if you have multiple statics that refer to each other in their initializers. –  Chris Dodd Jun 1 '09 at 22:10

I suppose the reason you want to do this is to improve readability by putting the long constant listings at the end of you code, right? An alternative (IMHO neither better nor worse, just different) would be to use a preprocessor include with the definition, such as:

[main file]
#include <iostream>
#include "bigIntArray.def"

int main()
{
    for( int i = 0; i < 10000 ; ++i)
    {
        std::cout << bigIntArray[i] << std::endl;
    }

    std::cin.ignore();
    return 0;
}

[bigIntArray.def]
static int bigIntArray[10000] = { 0, 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9 ... };

Even better, design-wise, would be to declare the array extern in a header, and put the definition in a stand-alone code file...

share|improve this answer

I had the same problem and my solution was to convert it to one line of numbers only, because any formatting (spaces, newlines, whatever) would not render the data readable anyway :

static unsigned char XXX_certificate[1376]={
48,130,5,92,48,176,231,119,149,87,108,108,225,239,138,233,91,116,236,200,117,213,130, <cut>
};

Thus I was able to put it at the start of my source file, note that it works because I don't use word wrapping.

share|improve this answer

You can forward declare your array using only extern like this:

extern int bigIntArray[5000];

You can also remove array size

extern int bigIntArray[];

This will tell the compiler that the array is defined somewhere else (later or other translation unit). In your case it will be defined later in the same translation unit as it is static global.

Works for me in VC++ 2010 Express.

share|improve this answer

This is an undefined behavior.

Consider this thread for more details:

https://groups.google.com/forum/#!topic/comp.lang.c.moderated/bmiF2xMz51U

The quotation from this link:

Because pre-1989 linkers varied in their ability to handle "hidden" symbols. If a linker can't cope with two symbols called "foo" in two different translation units that aren't the same object, then the compiler has to resolve the issue at translation - rather than link - time. And many C compilers were one-pass, so they need to assign an address and space to "foo" when they first see it, or at least the first time it's referenced. Hence the restriction.

As the Rationale puts it: "Prior to C90, implementations varied widely with regard to forward referencing identifiers with internal linkage."

Incidentally, the reason it was required to work in a single file for a symbol with external linkage is that the incomplete version ("int foo[];") might have been in a #included header file.

share|improve this answer

Is it possible to forward declare a static array

I think it is possible to forward declare with the use of pointer if you want to do it with static.

The pointer declaration will serve as your forward declaration. If your /* other code using bitIntArray */ are function definitions which will called be only after you could allocate the memory and initialize them, you can access the elements in the conventional way bigIntArray[index].

static int *bigIntArray;  // pointer to static integer

/*other code using bitIntArray: function definitions using forward declaration */
int func()
{
        printf("\nfunc %d \n",bigIntArray[3]);
}

int allocate()
{
        bigIntArray = new int[5]{1,2,3,4,5};
}

int main()
{
    allocate();
    func();
    return 0;
}

The array, being of static integers, will be limited to your compilation unit only.

Warning: One should always take such decisions based on your priorities. This way you may increase the readability of the code or whatever other reasons, for which you want forward declaration, but it would be at the expense of heap.

IMO, as D.A has suggested the best option is to use extern within a defined namespace. extern informs the compiler that the variable is defined elsewhere, and the defined namespace will limit its scope only to the units where the namespace will be used.

namespace limited
{
       extern int bigIntArray[];
};
/* other code using bitIntArray */
int func()
{
        using namespace limited;   
        printf("\nfunc %d \n",bigIntArray[3]);
}

namespace limited
{
        int bigIntArray[5] ={1,2,3,4,5};
};

int main()
{
        func();
        return 0;
}
share|improve this answer

@D. A. answer is best. - bounty to him
I concur with @Leafy on that regard.

Want to add that the array size is not needed in the instantiation if all initializers are there.

Also, having the array size up front has the advantage of being able to use sizeof(bigIntArray)

namespace {
    extern int bigIntArray[5];
}

// Code that uses bigIntArray
void fred() {
  size_t N = sizeof(bigIntArray)/sizeof(bigIntArray[0]);
}

namespace {
    int bigIntArray[/* 5 not needed */] = { 1, 2, 3, 4, 5 };
}
share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.