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I'm looking to do something like this in Java:

public OuterClass {

    public innerClass = new Object() {
        private var1;

        public void myMethod() {
           ...
        }
    }

}

and use it like this:

OuterClass outer = new OuterClass();
outer.innerClass.myMethod();

The reason is to basiclly namespace some methods within the OuterClass to keep things organised.

I know I could create an instance of innerClass and assign it to a public instance variable of OuterClass but I'm looking for an inline way of doing it like above example. I don't want it to be possible to instantiate the innerClass more than once hence the inline approach.

This woule be similar to the following JavaScript:

var innerObject = new function() {
   ...       
}
share|improve this question
    
Have you considered the Singleton design pattern? –  Johan Sjöberg Feb 20 '12 at 16:38
    
No. Though the inner class needs to access member variables of the outclass. –  Camsoft Feb 20 '12 at 16:41

2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted

What you asked in the question title is possible, but unfortunately not what you really want.

In your code, the line with the declaration of the field innerClass misses a type for the field. With the rest of the code unchanged, there is only one possibility: Object.

So your code would read like this:

public OuterClass {

    public Object innerClass = new Object() {
        private var1;

        public void myMethod() {
           ...
        }
    }
}

This is actually possible, but calling the method myMethod is not possible. When you access outer.innerClass, this expression is of type Object, which does not have a method myMethod, so the code won't compile.

You can however introduce an interface MyInnerInterface

interface MyInnerInterface {
    void myMethod();
}

and change the type of the field to MyInnerInterface:

public OuterClass {

    public MyInnerInterface innerClass = new MyInnerInterface() {
        private var1;

        public void myMethod() {
           ...
        }
    }
}

Then accessing the method is possible. However you have the drawback of the additional interface.

Also this code is unusual and I wouldn't consider it good. If you really want to have an inner class here, don't use an anonymous class, but a real class:

public OuterClass {

    public class InnerClass  {
        private var1;

        public void myMethod() {
           ...
        }
    }

    public InnerClass innerClass = new InnerClass();
}

Still, using an inner class for "scoping" accesses from the outside is something I wouldn't do. Inner classes should usually be an implementing detail of the outer class and not be accessible to the public. Better think about how to separate your API into real co-existing classes (which of course might have references onto each other, and possibly access package-private members).

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That makes total sense. Thanks. –  Camsoft Feb 20 '12 at 16:58

Have you tried:

public class OuterClass {

    public static void main(String[] args) {
        OuterClass o = new OuterClass();
        o.new InnerClass().method();
    }

    class InnerClass {

        public void method() {
            //do something
        }
    }
}

That uses the syntax you propose, but does not address your requirement that you don't want more than one instance of InnerClass.

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