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What is the proper way to show "Admin Tables" in my "Business Objects"? I have the following on my Address object.

public class Address
{
    public int AddressID { get; set; }
    public KeyValuePair<short, string> County { get; set; }
    ...
}

Now how would I instantiate this object, as far as the KeyValuePair<,> properties go?

My guess is:

var myAddress = new Address { AddressID = 3, County = new KeyValuePair<short, string>(32, "La Crosse")}

EDIT

This is what I am replacing with the KeyValuePair<> on the recommendations of another Programmer.

.....Address.cs..... 
public County County { get; set; }

.....County.cs.....
public class County
{
    public short? CountyID { get; set; }

    public string CountyName { get; set; }
}

Is there a better way between the two or a third way that is even better?

share|improve this question
1  
Are the values for the KVP coming from a database? Is it possible to extract them to an enumerated type so your magic numbers/characters are a bit less magical? – 48klocs Feb 20 '12 at 17:04
8  
I would advise against using a KeyValuePair in this situation; a developer cannot clearly see what the Key or Value actually is (what is the short Key for County?. Make your own type which has appropriate property names to make life easier for yourself and colleagues. – Lukazoid Feb 20 '12 at 17:06
    
I have removed irrelevant members. Please revert if you disagree. – CodesInChaos Feb 20 '12 at 17:08
1  
Your code works. So what is your problem? – CodesInChaos Feb 20 '12 at 17:11
    
@Lukazoid: Please see my edit and let me know if this makes more sense or if your statements still hold. – Refracted Paladin Feb 20 '12 at 17:12

KeyValuePair<T1, T2> buys you nothing in this case.

Why not just be explicit?

public class Address
{
    public int AddressID { get; set; }
    public int CountyCode { get; set; }
    public string CountyName { get; set; }
}

or another version would be that you define a type County with the two properties, then have a property of that type instead.

In code, clarity is king.

share|improve this answer

I just ran your code, and it worked as expected.

The country property has correct value Key = 32 and Value = La Crosse.


Your new code is ugly. I'd either remove the setter of the Country property, or make the Country class immutable. This kind of double mutability, is a bug waiting to happen.

Making the Country class immutable, is probably the right decision, since the Id=>Name mapping is fixed.

I'd use:

public class County
{
    public short? ID { get; private set; }
    public string Name { get; private set; }

    private Country(short? id,string name)
    {
      ID=id;
      Name=name;
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
Then if the name of a County needed to be change? Which is a very likely possibility. It doesn't feel right to be creating a new County, when what is desired it to actually update an existing one. I'm interested in hearing what your approach would be to this. – Lukazoid Feb 20 '12 at 17:24
    
Most of the time you don't need to change a country name at runtime, only once at load time. It's not like countries change there names all the time. But even if you do, the change should only happen from inside the Country class itself, and not through a place where a country is just used. For example by loading a new country definition file. – CodesInChaos Feb 20 '12 at 17:31

Lukazoid gives a good hint why not to do this, bus in fact, the Initialization you are showing would work well. You could have proofen this rather easy using your Debugger. What is the question?

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Create a Country object so it is clear what that short and string are supposed to represent.

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