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If I create a JavaScript object like:

var lst = [];
var row = [];
row.Col1 = 'val1';
row.Col2 = 'val2'; 
lst.push(row);

And then convert it to a string:

JSON.stringify(lst);

The result is an object containing an empty object:

[[]]

I would expect it to serialize like:

[[Col1 : 'val1', Col2: 'val2']]

Why do the inner objects properties not serialize?

Code snippet at JSFiddle.

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Visit json.org. You'll see that JSON has 2 structures. One allows key/value pairs, the other is a simple ordered list. JavaScript objects serialize to key/value pairs, and JavaScript arrays serialize to the ordered list. –  squint Feb 20 '12 at 17:36

4 Answers 4

up vote 4 down vote accepted

Because row is an array, not an object. Change it to:

var row = {};  

This creates an object literal. Your code will then result in an array of objects (containing a single object):

[{"Col1":"val1","Col2":"val2"}]

Update

To see what really happens, you can look at json2.js on GitHub. This is a (heavily reduced) snippet from the str function (called by JSON.stringify):

if (Object.prototype.toString.apply(value) === '[object Array]') {
    //...
    length = value.length;
    for (i = 0; i < length; i += 1) {
        partial[i] = str(i, value) || 'null';
    }
    //...
}
//...
for (k in value) {
    if (Object.prototype.hasOwnProperty.call(value, k)) {
        //...
    }
    //...
}
//...

Notice that arrays are iterated over with a normal for loop, which only enumerates the array elements. Objects are iterated with a for...in loop, with a hasOwnProperty test to make sure the proeprty actually belongs to this object.

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So an array only serializes its 1,2,3 keys, and not a random name like val1? –  Andomar Feb 20 '12 at 17:35
    
The contents of the array will be serialized. When you try to assign a value to a property of an array object, it doesn't actually get added to the array. –  James Allardice Feb 20 '12 at 17:37
    
Well, the property is added in the sense that it becomes visible in the debugger. –  Andomar Feb 20 '12 at 17:40
    
Yes, it's added to the object (that instance of Array), but JSON.stringify will only serialize the contents of the array, and not arbitrary properties of the object (otherwise you'd also get things like the length property). –  James Allardice Feb 20 '12 at 17:41
    
@Andomar - I've updated my answer with some more detail of what's actually going on behind the scenes. –  James Allardice Feb 20 '12 at 17:53

You use your inner array like an object, so make it an object instead of an array.

var lst = [];
var row = {};
row.Col1 = 'val1';
row.Col2 = 'val2'; 
lst.push(row);

or use it as an array

var lst = [];
var row = {};
row.push( 'val1' );
row.push( 'val2' );
lst.push(row);
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Thanks, upvoted! It was the answer from James that made me see {} is an object and [] is an array –  Andomar Feb 20 '12 at 17:52

You want row to be a dictionary, not a vector. Define it like this:

var row = {};
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+1 welcome to Stack Overflow :) –  Andomar Feb 20 '12 at 17:41

Since an array is a datatype in JSON, actual instances of Array are stringified differently than other object types.

If a JavaScript Array instance got stringified with its non-numeric keys intact, it couldn't be represented by the [ ... ] JSON array syntax.

For instance, [ "Col1": "val1"] would be invalid, because JSON arrays can't have explicit keys.
{"Col1": "val1"} would be valid - but it's not an array.

And you certainly can't mix'n'match and get { "Col1": "val1", 1, 2, 3 ] or something.

By the way, this works fine:

var lst = [];
var row = {};
row.Col1 = 'val1';
row.Col2 = 'val2'; 
lst.push(row);
alert(JSON.stringify(lst));​
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