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I would like to find out the number of different combinations of non-negative numbers(can be any number, it is not fixed) such that its total equals to the sum that is provided.

for example : I have 3 numbers and i want to find the different combinations of numbers such that the sum is 4. the value of num starts from 0. no negative numbers.

For 3 numbers that sum to 4, the combinations are

2 0 2
2 2 0
0 2 2
0 1 3
3 1 0
0 3 1 
1 0 3
1 3 0
3 0 1
0 0 4
4 0 0
0 4 0
2 1 1
1 2 1
1 1 2

I saw this as an example : Finding the total number combinations for an integer using three numbers

But the problem is it only uses three numbers.

Any algorithm or code will be useful. Thanks.

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3  
Any attempt at doing this yourself and letting us know of the same will be extra useful. –  Alok Save Feb 20 '12 at 17:46
5  
Infinite? 0+0+4, 1+1+2, 5+(-1)+0, 100+(-100)+4.... –  Dan W Feb 20 '12 at 17:47
1  
you need to show that you've attempted to solve this yourself before anyone is even going to consider helping you. –  Christopher Neylan Feb 20 '12 at 17:53
1  
The answer is still infinite. You can add an infinite number of zeroes to any other combination that sums to the target number. So your best option is probably a recursive solution that terminates when memory is exhausted. –  Adam Liss Feb 20 '12 at 18:23
1  
@lakesh: what do you have against (2, 1, 1), (1, 1, 2), and (1, 2, 1)? Why aren't they valid? –  DSM Feb 20 '12 at 18:36

2 Answers 2

You can view this as the number of ways to put s indistinguishable coins in n distinguishable jars. (In the example, s=4 and n=3).

As explained here, that is C(n+s-1,s-1), which gives 15 in the example.

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If order does not matter and 0 counts too, like in example link, then

n=total+1
k=number-1
binomial(k+n-1,k)  #combinations whith reptetitions
or
binomial(number+total-1,number-1)

If you represent number 5 as

 1+1+1+1+1

and have to find number of sums sums whith 3 integers
You can see that you have to do 2 slices out of 6 calculating combinations whit repetitions.

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for example, i have 3 numbers and total is 4, i can have 12 different ways of getting different numbers. but using your method, i get 12.5 after substituting the numbers in... –  lakesh Feb 20 '12 at 18:08
    
shld i round it down? –  lakesh Feb 20 '12 at 18:10
    
I put wrong method before, now it should be correct –  Luka Rahne Feb 20 '12 at 18:21

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